.177 vs. .22 for Squirrel

This article is staged in an FAQ style – this means that each independent section is meant to answer the query as a standalone resource. This will mean that some of the information may be duplicated in this article over several questions if the same information might apply.

This may mean that the article will seem slightly redundant at times. Each question can be targeted through the topical guide (table of contents at the beginning of the article), so you can get the answer to the question you desire quickly with a short scan of this TOC.

In This Article

Answering questions about .177 vs. .22 for Squirrel – Everything you need to know

.177 vs .22 for squirrel

Both .177 and .22 caliber pellets can be used to hunt squirrels, but the .22 caliber is generally considered to be a better choice. This is because the .22 caliber pellets are larger and heavier, and therefore have more kinetic energy when they hit the target. This means that they can deliver a more powerful impact and are more likely to take down a squirrel with one shot. Additionally, the .22 caliber pellets have a flatter trajectory, which makes them easier to shoot accurately at longer distances.

But it should be known – this is not just an article about air rifles and it WILL cover in-depth information about BOTH powder driven squirrel hunting options in addition to air guns. 

How does one know that a squirrel is not carrying a virus or disease, and that it is safe to eat when hunting with a .177 or .22 for squirrel?

When hunting squirrels, it’s important to be aware of the potential risks of consuming squirrels that may be carrying a virus or disease. Here are a few things to keep in mind to ensure that the squirrel is safe to eat:

  1. Check local regulations: Before hunting, it’s important to check local regulations and guidelines regarding hunting and consumption of wild game. Some areas may have restrictions or bans on hunting or consuming certain species of animals due to disease concerns.
  2. Look for signs of illness: Observe the squirrels before shooting and avoid any that appear sick or emaciated, as they may be more likely to carry a disease.
  3. Properly clean and prepare the meat: After the squirrel is killed, it’s important to properly clean and prepare the meat to reduce the risk of contamination. This includes removing the entrails, skinning, and properly cooking the meat.
  4. Check with local authorities: In case of any doubts or concerns, it is always a good idea to check with local authorities such as wildlife agencies or health department to get the latest information and recommendations on hunting and consuming wild game.
  5. Avoid consuming squirrels from heavily populated urban areas, as they may be more likely to be exposed to pollutants and other contaminants.

It’s important to note that while the above precautions can help reduce the risk of consuming contaminated squirrel meat, there is always some risk involved in consuming wild game, especially in cases where there is an outbreak of a known disease, it’s best to err on the side of caution and not consume the animal.

Some of this is obvious – and some of it is laid out in a more extreme manner than is necessary – it’s unlikely that a city squirrel is going to be MORE deadly to you, potentially, upon consumption, just because there is more smog in an urban center. That’s somewhat unrealistic. However – as preppers and educated folks, we should be thinking of inputs and causational relationships when securing food. 

Furthermore – a squirrel gets into things. And there are widespread concerns with some species of wild game at different times of the year. Currently there are all kinds of concerns with viruses and disease in deer populations throughout the United States. 

The best course of action, is experience and good judgement. In an extreme survival situation, where you haven’t eating for significant periods of time, it may be less important to worry about degenerative disease in a squirrel population, and worry more about right now – getting calories. You’d obviously want to prepare the meat properly and cook it to a level of doneness that generally kills bacterial infection and viral contaminants. 

Whereas, if you are hunting on any given Tuesday and observe sickly, emaciated, crazy looking squirrels with lumps all over its body, maybe you make a different decision about consumption.

Practicality, necessity, good understanding of what a healthy game target looks like, and a grasp on the food handling and safety basics is going to go a long way towards staying healthy yourself. 

How much meat is on a squirrel?

The amount of meat on a squirrel can vary depending on the species, age, and size of the animal. On average, a mature gray squirrel will weigh around 1.5 pounds, and a mature red squirrel will weigh around 0.5 pounds, this will yield around 6-8 ounces of meat per squirrel.

It’s worth noting that squirrels are considered to be small game animals, and the meat can be lean and gamey. They are generally considered to be a delicacy, and are often prepared with a marinade, or cooked in a stew or casserole to add moisture and flavor.

Also, it’s worth noting that it’s important to check the local laws and regulations for hunting and trapping squirrels, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting. Additionally, it’s important to practice ethical hunting and strive for a quick, humane kill.

Are there benefits to using a .22 or a .177 for hunting squirrel instead of a shotgun?

Using a .22 or .177 caliber airgun or firearm for hunting squirrels instead of a shotgun can have some benefits:

  1. Noise: Airguns and .22 caliber firearms are generally quieter than shotguns, which can be an advantage when hunting in areas where noise may be an issue, such as residential areas or near other hunters.
  2. Recoil: Airguns and .22 caliber firearms generally have less recoil than shotguns, which can be an advantage for inexperienced or recoil-sensitive shooters.
  3. Range: Airguns and .22 caliber firearms can be used for hunting at longer ranges than shotguns, which can be an advantage when hunting in open areas or when the squirrels are high up in trees.
  4. Meat Damage: Airguns and .22 caliber firearms generally cause less meat damage than shotguns, which can be an advantage when hunting for food.
  5. Cost: Airguns and .22 caliber firearms ammunition is generally less expensive than shotgun ammunition, which can be an advantage for budget-conscious hunters.
  6. Airguns and .22 caliber firearms are also more discreet and have less recoil, which can be an advantage for hunting in urban areas, or for hunters who want to avoid scaring other animals.

It’s worth noting that each hunting method has its own unique advantages and disadvantages, and the choice of the most appropriate method will depend on the specific hunting scenario and the hunter’s preferences. Additionally, it’s important to check the local laws and regulations for hunting and trapping squirrels, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting. Additionally, it’s important to practice ethical hunting and strive for a quick, humane kill.

What game animals are similar to squirrel and can be dispatched with a .177 or .22 caliber projectile?

Game animals similar to squirrels that can be dispatched with a .177 or .22 caliber projectile include:

-Rabbits: They are small and fast, so a well-placed shot is needed to take them down humanely.

-Prairie dogs: They are also small and fast, and a well-placed shot is needed to take them down humanely.

-Groundhogs: They are slightly larger than squirrels and rabbits, but still considered small game animals.

-Coypu: Also known as a nutria, they are medium-sized rodent that can be found near water bodies and are considered pests in some areas.

-Pigeons and doves: These birds can be hunted with .177 or .22 caliber projectiles.

-Varmints and pests: such as raccoons, opossums, and skunks, can also be dispatched with a .177 or .22 caliber projectile.

It’s important to note that laws and regulations for hunting small game animals vary by state and country, and it’s essential to check and abide by those laws, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting. Additionally, it’s important to use the appropriate caliber and style of pellet for the specific type of hunting and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the pellet, and always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals with an airgun.

In which states and geographical areas is squirrel hunting considered mainstream?

Squirrel hunting is considered mainstream in many states and geographical areas across the United States. Many states have open seasons for squirrel hunting, with specific dates and limits set by state wildlife agencies. However, the popularity and accessibility of squirrel hunting can vary depending on the state and region. In general, squirrel hunting is more popular and accessible in rural areas and in states with large areas of forested land, as these areas provide a suitable habitat for squirrels.

Some states with large hunting communities and ample hunting opportunities for squirrels include:

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Georgia
  • Kentucky
  • Missouri
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia

It’s important to note that laws and regulations for hunting squirrels may vary from state to state and it’s always important to check the laws of the area you plan to hunt in, to make sure you comply with them. Additionally, hunting seasons, limits, and bag limits for squirrels may also vary depending on the state, it’s always important to check the specific regulations in the area you plan to hunt before doing so.

It’s also important to note that it’s difficult to say anything 100% accurately for all 50 states, or any large number of geographical locations/jurisdictions. The point is this: Know where to find out about your local and state/territorial laws. Know what they are, from a general perspective, and brush up on them each new legislative calendar year. 

Furthermore, with regards to squirrel hunting – this is not a comprehensive list of where squirrel can be hunted – it’s a list of places where squirrel hunting is considered “more mainstream” and that is a subjective idea, as a standalone concept anyway. Squirrel hunting is generally acceptable pretty much anywhere where hunting is allowed. 

Please be sure to understand your jurisdictional requirements to discharge a firearm, or shoot a firearm (yes, even if it’s an airgun) for your area. You wouldn’t want to face criminal charge just by plinking or hunting small game. 

The history of the .22L and the .177 pellet 

The .22 Long Rifle (LR) cartridge is one of the most popular and widely used cartridges in the world. It was first introduced in 1887 by J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company, and it quickly became a popular choice for target shooting, small game hunting, and plinking. The .22 LR cartridge is rimfire, meaning that the primer is located in the rim of the cartridge case.

The .22 LR cartridge is based on the older .22 Long cartridge, which was first introduced in 1871. The .22 Long was a longer cartridge than the .22 Short, and it had a longer case and a heavier bullet. However, it still had a relatively low velocity and energy, and it was not as popular as the .22 Short. In an effort to improve the performance of the .22 Long cartridge, J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company shortened the case and increased the powder charge, resulting in the .22 LR cartridge.

The .22 LR cartridge became an instant success, and it quickly replaced the .22 Long and .22 Short cartridges in popularity. The .22 LR cartridge has a muzzle velocity of 1,050-1,200 feet per second and is known for its low recoil, noise, and meat damage. It is suitable for a wide range of applications, including target shooting, small game hunting, and plinking.

The .177 caliber airgun pellets are typically used in air rifles and air pistols. They were first developed in the early 20th century and were originally made of lead. They have a diameter of .177 inches (4.5 mm) and come in different weights and shapes such as wadcutters, domes, and pointed pellets. They are known for their high accuracy, low recoil, and relatively low noise.

Airguns have been around since the 15th century, but it wasn’t until the late 19th century that they began to be used for hunting small game. This was due to advances in technology, such as the invention of the pneumatic pump, which allowed airguns to achieve higher velocities and energies. The .177 caliber airgun pellets became popular in the early 20th century, as they were found to be suitable for small game hunting, target shooting, and plinking.

One of the main advantages of .177 caliber airgun pellets is their high accuracy. They are designed to be aerodynamic and stable in flight.

Another advantage of .177 caliber airgun pellets is their low recoil and noise. Airguns are powered by compressed air or CO2, which means that they produce very little recoil and noise compared to powder-driven firearms. This makes them suitable for indoor target shooting, backyard plinking, and hunting in areas where noise is a concern.

The .177 caliber airgun pellets are also relatively low-cost, compared to powder-driven firearms. They can be purchased in bulk for a relatively low price, and they can be reused if they are not damaged. Additionally, the cost of compressed air or CO2 is generally lower than the cost of ammunition for powder-driven firearms.

It’s worth noting that the .177 caliber airgun pellets are not suitable for hunting large game animals and they may not be as powerful as powder-driven firearms. However, they can be suitable for hunting small game animals such as squirrels, birds, and rabbits when the shot placement is accurate and the distance to the target is close enough.

Overall, the .22 LR cartridge and the .177 caliber airgun pellets are two of the most popular and widely used types of ammunition in the world. They have been around for over a century and have proven themselves to be suitable for a wide range of applications, from target shooting and small game hunting to backyard plinking. They have their own unique advantages and disadvantages, and choosing the right one depends on the specific application and personal preference.

In recent years, the popularity of airguns has continued to grow, and manufacturers have been developing new designs and technologies to improve their performance. For example, some modern airguns are now equipped with high-powered precharged pneumatic (PCP) systems, which allow them to achieve velocities and energies that are similar to those of powder-driven firearms. These high-powered airguns are suitable for hunting larger game animals, such as deer and wild boar, and they are becoming increasingly popular among hunters and shooters.

Another development in airguns has been the use of non-lead pellets, such as those made of polymer or alloy. These pellets are more environmentally friendly and are legal to use in some areas where lead pellets are not.

In terms of the .22 LR, It is still widely used today in a variety of firearms, such as rifles, handguns, and even some shotguns. It is known for its low recoil and noise, making it a favorite for target shooting, plinking, and small game hunting. It’s also a popular choice for novice shooters, as it is relatively inexpensive to purchase and shoot.

Additionally, it has a wide range of ammunition options available, from standard velocity to subsonic, and from match grade to high velocity, to suit different needs and preferences.

In conclusion, the .22 LR and .177 caliber airgun pellets have been around for over a century and have proven to be suitable for a wide range of applications. They are both popular and widely used types of ammunition, but they have their own unique advantages and disadvantages. The .22 LR is a powder driven round that is well suited for small game hunting, target shooting and plinking, while the .177 caliber airgun pellets are well suited for target shooting, small game hunting, and plinking, they are also relatively low-cost and quiet, and are environmentally friendly. Ultimately, the choice between the two comes down to personal preference and the specific application.

Basic broad information about Squirrel Hunting and .177 vs. .22 for Squirrel

What is an ideal area to hunt squirrels? What is the ideal position to hunt a squirrel in?

An ideal area to hunt squirrels is one that has a mix of forested and open areas, as well as a good population of squirrels. Squirrels are found in many different types of habitats including deciduous, coniferous, and mixed forests, as well as urban and suburban areas.

The ideal position to hunt a squirrel depends on the specific hunting scenario. When hunting in a wooded area, it’s best to be in a position that provides a clear view of the area where the squirrels are likely to be, such as the base of a tree or a clear spot in the woods. When hunting in an open area, it’s best to be in a position that provides cover, such as a blind or a bush.

Some tips for hunting squirrels include:

  1. Look for signs of activity such as fresh tracks, droppings, and gnawed nuts.
  2. Pay attention to the time of day and the weather conditions. Squirrels are most active in the early morning and late afternoon.
  3. Use calls or decoys to attract squirrels to a specific area.
  4. Move slowly and quietly to avoid scaring the squirrels away.
  5. Use camouflage clothing and hide in natural cover.
  6. Be patient and wait for the squirrels to come to you.
  7. Always practice ethical hunting and strive for a quick, humane kill.

It’s important to check the local laws and regulations for hunting and trapping squirrels, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting. Additionally, it’s important to practice ethical hunting and strive for a quick, humane kill.

What weight of an animal can be dispatched humanely with a .177 or a .22 pellet out of an airgun?

The weight of an animal that can be dispatched humanely with a .177 or a .22 pellet out of an airgun depends on several factors such as the power of the airgun, the type and weight of the pellet, and the skill of the shooter.

In general, a .22 caliber pellet fired from a high-powered airgun can humanely dispatch small game animals up to the size of a squirrel or a rabbit, while a .177 caliber pellet can humanely dispatch smaller animals such as birds and rodents.

The key to humanely dispatching an animal with an airgun is to deliver a well-placed shot that quickly and effectively takes down the animal, ideally with a single shot. This means aiming for the vital organs, such as the heart and lungs, and avoiding shots that could cause excessive damage or prolonged suffering.

It’s worth noting that the weight and size of the animal are not the only factors to consider when choosing the appropriate caliber and pellet for hunting. Other factors such as the distance to the target, the intended use of the pellet, and the laws and regulations for hunting small game animals should also be taken into account.

It’s important to note that hunting small game animals with airguns requires a good aim and a well-placed shot to ensure a humane kill. Additionally, it’s important to use the appropriate caliber and style of pellet for the specific type of hunting and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the pellet. It’s also important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting small game animals, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting.

It’s also worth noting that while an airgun may be capable of humanely dispatching an animal of a certain size, it ultimately comes down to the skill and experience of the shooter. A skilled shooter with a well-maintained and powerful airgun may be able to humanely dispatch larger animals than a less experienced shooter with a lower powered airgun.

It’s important to practice and hone your skills with the airgun before attempting to hunt, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals with an airgun.

What size or game species is not suitable to be hunted with a .177 or a .22 pellet out of an airgun?

The size or game species that is not suitable to be hunted with a .177 or a .22 pellet out of an airgun is larger game animals such as deer, wild boar, or bear. These animals are much larger and tougher than small game animals like squirrels or rabbits, and require a much more powerful and effective projectile to be taken down humanely.

Additionally, it’s also important to consider the legal restrictions and regulations when hunting big game animals as hunting them with airguns is typically illegal.

In general, a .177 caliber pellet fired from a high-powered airgun can humanely dispatch small game animals up to the size of a squirrel or a rabbit, while a .22 caliber pellet can humanely dispatch a slightly larger animals such as raccoons or opossums. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the weight and size of the animal are not the only factors to consider when choosing the appropriate caliber and pellet for hunting. Other factors such as the distance to the target, the intended use of the pellet, and the laws and regulations for hunting small game animals should also be taken into account.

It’s important to use the appropriate caliber and style of pellet for the specific type of hunting and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the pellet. It’s also important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals with an airgun.

Hunting Squirrel with powder driven cartridges instead of low caliber air driven pellets – what is the most important information?

What are the .17 powder driven cartridges on the market, and which manufacturers of firearms and ammunition are selling products for these cartridges? What are the benefits of .17 rimfire and .17 centerfire cartridges in the mainstream market?

The .17 caliber powder-driven cartridges on the market include:

Some of the manufacturers of firearms and ammunition that sell products for these cartridges include:

  • Hornady
  • Winchester
  • Remington
  • CCI (Cascade Cartridges Inc.)
  • Federal

The .17 HMR is a rimfire cartridge that was introduced in 2002, it is known for its high velocity and flat trajectory, making it suitable for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting.

The .17 WSM is a centerfire cartridge that was introduced in 2012, it is known for its high velocity, and it’s capable of reaching up to 3,000 fps, making it suitable for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting.

The .17 Remington Fireball is a centerfire cartridge that was introduced in 2007, it is known for its high velocity and flat trajectory, making it suitable for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting.

The benefits of .17 caliber cartridges include their flat trajectory, high velocity and accuracy, which makes them suitable for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting. They also tend to generate less recoil and noise compared to larger caliber cartridges, and they can be more cost-effective over the long run as they tend to use less powder per shot. Additionally, the .17 caliber is also known for producing less meat damage, which is important for those who are hunting for food.

What is the actual specification for the 17 caliber cartridges? What grain weights do they feature in, and what are the SAAMI specifications for the cartridges? Is their nominal projectile diameter actually .17 or is it different, like .177?

The actual specifications for the .17 caliber cartridges vary depending on the specific cartridge. Here are some of the specifications for a few popular .17 caliber cartridges:

  • .17 HMR (Hornady Magnum Rimfire):
    • Bullet diameter: .172 inches
    • Nominal projectile weight: 17 grains
    • Muzzle velocity: 2,550-2,750 feet per second
    • SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) pressure limit: 24,000 psi
  • .17 WSM (Winchester Super Magnum):
    • Bullet diameter: .172 inches
    • Nominal projectile weight: 20-25 grains
    • Muzzle velocity: 3,000 feet per second
    • SAAMI pressure limit: 45,000 psi
  • .17 Remington Fireball:
    • Bullet diameter: .172 inches
    • Nominal projectile weight: 20-25 grains
    • Muzzle velocity: 3,000 feet per second
    • SAAMI pressure limit: 42,000 psi

It’s important to note that the actual bullet diameter for these cartridges may vary slightly depending on the specific manufacturer or brand. The .17 caliber cartridges usually feature .172 inches bullet diameter, which is slightly larger than .177 caliber projectile.

It’s also worth noting that the SAAMI specifications are the industry standards for pressure and dimension, but individual manufacturers may have their own specifications that may vary slightly. 

How do these cartridges compare to the highest performance airgun pellets in .177 diameter – what are the comparative ballistics including velocity, grain weights, energy delivery both at the muzzle and on the target?

The .17 caliber cartridges, such as the .17 HMR, .17 WSM, and .17 Remington Fireball, have significantly higher velocities and muzzle energy than the highest performance airgun pellets in .177 diameter.

For example, the .17 HMR has a muzzle velocity of 2,550-2,750 feet per second and delivers around 250 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle, while the highest performance .177 caliber airgun pellets typically have a muzzle velocity of around 1,000 feet per second and deliver around 20 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle.

The .17 WSM and .17 Remington Fireball have a muzzle velocity of 3,000 feet per second and delivers around 400 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle.

In terms of grain weight, the .17 caliber cartridges typically use lighter bullets than the highest performance .177 caliber airgun pellets, which can be in the range of 15-20 grains.

It’s also worth noting that the energy delivered to the target will depend on a number of factors, such as the distance to the target, the design of the bullet, and the specific caliber and brand of the ammunition.

In summary, the .17 caliber cartridges have significantly higher velocities, muzzle energy and lighter grain weight than the highest performance airgun pellets in .177 diameter, which makes them more powerful and suitable for larger game animals and long-range target shooting. While airguns are more suitable for small game hunting, pest control and backyard target shooting.

What are the different .22 powder driven cartridges on the market – and what are their specifications including SAAMI specs, performance specifications, accuracy considerations, and ballistics?

There are several different .22 caliber powder-driven cartridges on the market. Here are some of the most popular ones and their specifications:

  • .22 Long Rifle (LR):
    • Bullet diameter: .222 inches
    • Nominal projectile weight: 40 grains
    • Muzzle velocity: 1,050-1,200 feet per second
    • SAAMI pressure limit: 21,000 psi
    • This cartridge is commonly used for target shooting, plinking, and small game hunting. It is considered as one of the most popular and versatile cartridges in the world.
  • .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire (WMR):
    • Bullet diameter: .224 inches
    • Nominal projectile weight: 40 grains
    • Muzzle velocity: 1,500-1,900 feet per second
    • SAAMI pressure limit: 24,000 psi
    • This cartridge is known for its high velocity and flat trajectory, which makes it suitable for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting.
  • .22 Hornet:
    • Bullet diameter: .224 inches
    • Nominal projectile weight: 45-55 grains
    • Muzzle velocity: 2,200-2,600 feet per second
    • SAAMI pressure limit: 32,000 psi
    • This cartridge is considered as a centerfire cartridge and it’s a popular choice for small game hunting and varmint hunting.
  • .22-250 Remington:
    • Bullet diameter: .224 inches
    • Nominal projectile weight: 40-60 grains
    • Muzzle velocity: 3,600-4,200 feet per second
    • SAAMI pressure limit: 60,000 psi
    • This cartridge is considered as a centerfire cartridge, it’s known for its high velocity and flat trajectory, which makes it suitable for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting.

The SAAMI specifications are the industry standards for pressure and dimension, but individual manufacturers may have their own specifications that may vary slightly. The accuracy considerations would depend on the specific cartridge, the rifle, the shooter and the conditions, and it’s always important to consult the manufacturer’s specifications and consult with a professional before using any ammunition.

It’s important to note that when considering these cartridges for hunting or target shooting, it’s important to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the cartridge. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals.

In terms of ballistics, the .22 caliber cartridges have a slightly larger bullet diameter than the .17 caliber cartridges and they have a lower velocity and muzzle energy compared to the .17 caliber cartridges, but they are considered more powerful than the .177 caliber airgun projectiles. The .22 caliber cartridges can be used for small game hunting, target shooting and varmint control. They tend to have a flatter trajectory, and they are known for producing less recoil, noise, and meat damage compared to larger caliber cartridges.

In summary, the .22 caliber cartridges are versatile and widely used in hunting and target shooting. They offer a good balance of power, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness, and they are suitable for a wide range of applications and game animals.

Is 22 Winchester Magnum too heavy of a load for a squirrel, generally?

The .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire (WMR) cartridge is considered a high-powered cartridge and is generally considered too heavy of a load for a squirrel. The .22 WMR is primarily used for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting and it has a muzzle velocity of 1,500-1,900 feet per second which is much higher than the velocity of a .22 LR, which is considered a good choice for small game hunting including squirrels.

The high velocity and energy of the .22 WMR cartridge can cause excessive damage to the squirrel and make it less desirable for consumption. Additionally, the .22 WMR is also known for producing more recoil and noise compared to the .22 LR and other small caliber cartridges, which can make it less suitable for close-range hunting.

It’s important to note that the squirrels are small game animals, and using a high-powered cartridge like the .22 WMR can cause excessive damage to the animal and makes it less humane, and also can make it less desirable for consumption.

It’s always a good idea to use the appropriate caliber and style of cartridge for the specific type of hunting and take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the cartridge. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals.

What are the centerfire .22 or .17 cartridges on the market

Centerfire cartridges are cartridges that have a primer located in the center of the base of the cartridge case. They are distinct from rimfire cartridges, which have the primer located in the rim of the cartridge case. Here are a few examples of centerfire .22 and .17 cartridges that are available on the market:

  • .22-250 Remington: a high-powered .22 caliber cartridge that is commonly used for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting. It has a muzzle velocity of 3,600-4,200 feet per second and is known for its flat trajectory and high accuracy.
  • .220 Swift: another high-powered .22 caliber cartridge that is commonly used for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting. It has a muzzle velocity of 4,200-4,500 feet per second and is known for its high velocity and flat trajectory.
  • .17 Remington: a high-powered .17 caliber cartridge that is commonly used for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting. It has a muzzle velocity of 3,000 feet per second and is known for its flat trajectory and high accuracy.
  • .17 Remington Fireball: another high-powered .17 caliber cartridge that is commonly used for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting. It has a muzzle velocity of 3,000 feet per second and is known for its flat trajectory and high accuracy.
  • .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire (HMR): a high-powered .17 caliber cartridge that is commonly used for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting. It has a muzzle velocity of 2,550-2,750 feet per second and is known for its flat trajectory and high accuracy.

It’s worth noting that these are just a few examples of centerfire .22 and .17 cartridges that are available on the market and there are many others that are not listed here. Additionally, the specific characteristics of each cartridge may vary depending on the manufacturer or brand. It’s always important to consult the manufacturer’s specifications and consult with a professional before using any ammunition.

Are any of the other new .22 cartridges, including centerfire .22 cartridges suitable for squirrel or is the velocity and energy load too heavy?

Some of the newer .22 caliber centerfire cartridges are capable of delivering high velocities and energy levels that may be too heavy for squirrel hunting. These cartridges are primarily designed for varmint hunting, long-range target shooting, or larger game animals and their high velocity and energy can cause excessive damage to the squirrel and make it less desirable for consumption.

It is important to note that when hunting squirrels, it is generally recommended to use a cartridge that is designed for small game hunting, such as the .22 Long Rifle (LR), which is considered a good choice for squirrel hunting. This cartridge has a muzzle velocity of 1,050-1,200 feet per second and is known for its low recoil, noise, and meat damage.

It’s always a good idea to use the appropriate caliber and style of cartridge for the specific type of hunting and take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the cartridge. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals.

Are the .17 Remington Fireball and the .17 HMR too fast and too hard hitting to be suitable for squirrel hunting, generally?

The .17 Remington Fireball and the .17 HMR are both high-powered cartridges that are typically used for varmint hunting and long-range target shooting. They are known for their high velocities and flat trajectories, which make them suitable for longer-range shooting.

The .17 Remington Fireball has a muzzle velocity of 3,000 feet per second and delivers around 400 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle. The .17 HMR has a muzzle velocity of 2,550-2,750 feet per second and delivers around 250 ft-lbs of energy at the muzzle. These cartridges are capable of delivering high velocities and energy levels that may be too heavy for squirrel hunting. The high velocity and energy of these cartridges can cause excessive damage to the squirrel and make it less desirable for consumption.

While these cartridges can technically be used for squirrel hunting, it is generally recommended to use a cartridge that is designed for small game hunting, such as the .22 Long Rifle (LR), which is considered a good choice for squirrel hunting. This cartridge has a muzzle velocity of 1,050-1,200 feet per second and is known for its low recoil, noise, and meat damage.

It’s always a good idea to use the appropriate caliber and style of cartridge for the specific type of hunting and take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the cartridge. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals.

Hunting Squirrel with a Shotgun – is this a possibility?

Shotgun hunting for squirrel is ABSOLUTELY a thing

It’s not something that requires in-depth analysis here, in our opinion

Here are some notes however to help you navigate the subject:

  • Squirrels yield very little meat. They are best dispatched with a head shot or a spine breaking kill with a small caliber bullet, and usually it’s best to shoot them up close (under 50 to 75 feet) with a high velocity, low mass bullet if it’s got enough power to kill humanely. 
  • Aside from sport – which we generally aren’t as interested in, as opposed to for gathering food – it doesn’t make as much practical sense to hunt with a shotgun on small game unless the game is fast and moving during the hunt (e.g. rabbits)
  • Shotgun pellets may be effective at dispatching a squirrel, but you have to clean them pellets out before consumption
  • The powder charge and total weight of projectile mass on target is far too heavy for such a small animal, unless you are in a densely forested area, and shooting at great distance – even then, it’s hard to clean/eat the game after the kill
  • While .410 is a best practice type shotgun shell for squirrel hunting, it too, may be a less than ideal round for hunting such small, captive game, when a small caliber, high velocity firearms is available
  • Shotguns are also loud
  • It can be done – it is done frequently, and jsut about everywhere, but it may not be ideal unless you have a specific preference for it, or only own a shotgun

What are some other calibers (not including .177, .17, .22 and .22LR) that are considered appropriate for hunting squirrel?

Other than .177, .17, .22, and .22LR, there are several other calibers that are considered appropriate for hunting squirrels, but the selection of caliber may depend on personal preference, state regulations and the size of the squirrel species you’re hunting. Here are a few examples:

  1. .20 caliber: Some airgun manufacturers make .20 caliber pellets which can be used to hunt squirrels, it’s considered to be a good choice for larger squirrel species.
  2. .25 caliber: Some airgun manufacturers make .25 caliber pellets which can be used to hunt squirrels, it’s considered to be a good choice for larger squirrel species and have a bit more knockdown power than .20 caliber pellets.
  3. .30 caliber: Some airgun manufacturers make .30 caliber pellets which can be used to hunt squirrels, it’s considered to be a good choice for larger squirrel species and have more knockdown power than .25 caliber pellets.
  4. .410 caliber: .410 caliber firearms, also known as .410 bore, are considered appropriate for hunting squirrels, the small size of the projectile and the low recoil of the firearm make it a good choice for small game hunting.

Product Specific Information related to Squirrel Hunting and .177 vs. .22 for Squirrel

What are the heaviest grain weight .22LR’s on the market?

The heaviest grain weight .22 LR’s on the market are typically around 60-grain. However, it’s worth noting that .22 LR ammunition is typically offered in a range of bullet weights, from around 30-40 grains for standard velocity rounds, to around 45-60 grains for high-velocity rounds. It’s also worth noting that these heavy weight .22LR rounds are not as common as the standard weight rounds.

Here are a few examples of heavy weight .22 LR rounds available on the market:

  • CCI Maxi-Mag +V: This round is loaded with a 40-grain JHP bullet and has a muzzle velocity of 1,870 feet per second, it’s considered a high velocity round and is designed for varmint hunting and long-range shooting.
  • Remington Thunderbolt: This round is loaded with a 40-grain lead round nose bullet and has a muzzle velocity of 1,070 feet per second, it’s considered a standard velocity round and is designed for small game hunting and target shooting.
  • Federal Champion: This round is loaded with a 40-grain lead round nose bullet and has a muzzle velocity of 1,080 feet per second, it’s considered a standard velocity round and is designed for small game hunting and target shooting.

It’s important to note that these heavy weight .22 LR rounds may not be as suitable for small game hunting as the lighter weight rounds, as they may cause more meat damage.

Additionally, high velocity rounds may not be suitable for indoor target shooting, as they can be louder and produce more chance for ricochet, with an underequipped range setup – this is particularly true for small bullet traps, or home-based ranges.

THIS TYPE OF SETUP CAN BE EXCEPTIONALLY DANGEROUS.

It is discouraged to set up a home based range and use high velocity, low grain weight projectiles. Any range that is tasked with handling high power, high velocity or hyper velocity, low grain weight projectiles should be PROPERLY EQUIPPED to do so.

This is a common problem for those that do not understand the equipment and materials and engineering behind ballistic traps, high velocity ancillary concerns and ballistic engineering at a high level.

Regarding hunting and field use: it’s always a good idea to use the appropriate caliber and style of cartridge for the specific type of hunting and take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the cartridge.

Product Specific Information related to Squirrel Hunting and .177 vs. .22 for Squirrel

Regarding hunting squirrel, can an air rifle .22 even compete at all with a .22LR?

An air rifle .22 caliber can be a viable option for hunting squirrels, but it may not be as effective as a .22LR when it comes to lethality and penetration. A .22LR cartridge has significantly more kinetic energy than a .22 caliber airgun pellet and it will deliver a more powerful impact upon impact and has a greater potential for taking down the animal with one shot. Additionally, the .22 LR bullet is designed to expand upon impact, which creates a larger wound channel and increases the chances of a quick, humane kill.

An air rifle .22 caliber can be a good option for hunting squirrels if the shooter has the appropriate skills and experience, and the air rifle is of good quality and has enough power to deliver a humane kill. It’s important to note that hunting small game animals like squirrels with an airgun requires a good aim and a well-placed shot to ensure a humane kill.

It’s worth noting that both .22 caliber airguns and .22LR rifles can be used for hunting squirrels, but the choice ultimately comes down to personal preference, the intended use of the projectile and the laws and regulations for hunting small game animals. Additionally, it’s important to use the appropriate caliber and style of projectile for the specific type of hunting and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal and the intended use of the projectile.

How can a projectile traveling so slow relative to it’s powder driven peers compete on game hunting?

A projectile traveling at a slower speed than its powder-driven peers can still be effective for hunting small game animals such as squirrels, rabbits, and birds, as long as it is well-designed and well-placed.

Airguns typically use pellets, which are designed to expand upon impact, and this allows them to deliver a powerful shock to the animal, which can quickly take it down. Additionally, airguns can shoot with a high accuracy, which allows for precise shot placement. When the shot is well-placed, the slower speed of the projectile can be compensated by the kinetic energy it delivers upon impact.

Another advantage of airguns is the relatively low noise they produce, which allows to hunt in areas where loud noise would be disruptive, such as residential areas.

It’s worth noting that when hunting with airguns, it’s important to use the appropriate caliber and style of pellet for the specific type of hunting and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the pellet. It’s also important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals with an airgun.

In summary, while airguns may not have the same speed as powder-driven firearms, they can still be an effective hunting tool for small game animals as long as they are well-designed, well-placed and used in the appropriate scenario.

What about specialty grain weight bullets that are loaded to reduce velocity, such as for hunting squirrel with a silencer, or to slow down the round for ultra short range terminal performance?

You are correct that there are specialty grain weight bullets that are loaded to reduce velocity for specific purposes, such as hunting squirrel with a silencer or for ultra short range terminal performance. These rounds are known as subsonic rounds and they are designed to be used with a suppressor or silencer, as they produce less noise than standard velocity rounds.

Examples of subsonic .22 LR rounds available on the market include:

  • CCI Suppressor .22 LR: This round is loaded with a 45-grain lead round nose bullet and has a muzzle velocity of 910 feet per second. It is specifically designed to be used with a suppressor and is suitable for small game hunting and target shooting.
  • Aguila SubSonic .22 LR: This round is loaded with a 60-grain lead round nose bullet and has a muzzle velocity of 710 feet per second. It is specifically designed to be used with a suppressor and is suitable for small game hunting and target shooting.
  • Remington Subsonic .22 LR: This round is loaded with a 40-grain lead round nose bullet and has a muzzle velocity of 1050 feet per second. It is specifically designed to be used with a suppressor and is suitable for small game hunting and target shooting.

It’s important to note that while subsonic rounds are designed to produce less noise, they may not be as accurate or as powerful as standard velocity rounds. Additionally, they may not be suitable for hunting larger game animals, and they may not be legal to use in some areas. It’s always a good idea to use the appropriate caliber and style of cartridge for the specific type of hunting and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the cartridge. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick, humane kill.

What are some reduced velocity or low powder charge .22LR rounds? By brand. What is this type of load’s suitability for hunting squirrel?

Reduced velocity or low powder charge .22 LR rounds are designed to produce less recoil and noise compared to standard .22 LR rounds. These types of rounds are commonly used for indoor target shooting, training, and small game hunting.

Here are a few examples of reduced velocity or low powder charge .22 LR rounds available on the market:

  • CCI Quiet-22: This round is loaded with a 40-grain lead round nose bullet and is designed to produce 70% less noise compared to standard .22 LR rounds. It has a muzzle velocity of 710 feet per second and is suitable for indoor target shooting and small game hunting.
  • Aguila Super Colibri: This round is loaded with a 20-grain lead bullet and is designed to produce a low report and minimal recoil. It has a muzzle velocity of 410 feet per second and is suitable for indoor target shooting, training, and small game hunting.
  • Remington Thunderbolt: This round is loaded with a 40-grain lead round nose bullet and is designed to produce less recoil and noise compared to standard .22 LR rounds. It has a muzzle velocity of 1,070 feet per second and is suitable for small game hunting and target shooting.
  • Federal Champion: This round is loaded with a 40-grain lead round nose bullet and is designed to produce less recoil and noise compared to standard .22 LR rounds. It has a muzzle velocity of 1,080 feet per second and is suitable for small game hunting and target shooting.

It’s important to note that reduced velocity or low powder charge .22 LR rounds are not as powerful as standard .22 LR rounds, and they may not be suitable for hunting larger game animals. However, they can be suitable for hunting squirrels, as long as the shot placement is accurate and the distance to the target is close enough.

Isn’t it more effective to use a slower, less energy heavy projectile for hunting squirrel if it’s enough to kill the squirrel humanely?

It can be more effective to use a slower, less energy-heavy projectile for hunting squirrels if it is enough to kill the animal humanely.

A slower, less energy-heavy projectile can still be effective for hunting squirrels as long as it is well-designed and well-placed. A well-designed pellet that has a good expansion upon impact can deliver a powerful shock to the animal, which can quickly take it down. Additionally, airguns can shoot with a high accuracy, which allows for precise shot placement. When the shot is well-placed, the slower speed of the projectile can be compensated by the kinetic energy it delivers upon impact.

A slower projectile also has less recoil and generates less noise compared to faster projectiles, this allows for a more humane take-down of the animal and also for hunting in areas where loud noise would be disruptive, such as residential areas.

It’s important to keep in mind that when hunting with airguns, it’s important to use the appropriate caliber and style of pellet for the specific type of hunting and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the pellet. It’s also important to be aware of the laws and regulations for hunting, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting, and to always strive for a quick and humane kill when hunting small game animals with an airgun.

What are some of the major airgun makers that manufacture a high velocity .177 or .22 airgun?

Some major airgun manufacturers that manufacture high velocity .177 or .22 caliber airguns include:

  1. Benjamin: Benjamin is a well-known airgun manufacturer that produces a wide range of high-velocity airguns, including the Benjamin Marauder, which is a PCP airgun that is available in .177 and .22 caliber.
  2. Gamo: Gamo is a Spanish airgun manufacturer that produces a wide range of high-velocity airguns, including the Gamo Hornet, which is a break-barrel airgun that is available in .177 and .22 caliber.
  3. Crosman: Crosman is an American airgun manufacturer that produces a wide range of high-velocity airguns, including the Crosman Nitro Venom, which is a break-barrel airgun that is available in .177 and .22 caliber.
  4. Weihrauch: Weihrauch is a German airgun manufacturer that produces a wide range of high-velocity airguns, including the Weihrauch HW100, which is a PCP airgun that is available in .177 and .22 caliber.
  5. Air Arms: Air Arms is a British airgun manufacturer that produces a wide range of high-velocity airguns, including the Air Arms S200, which is a PCP airgun that is available in .177 and .22 caliber.
  6. Hatsan: Hatsan is a Turkish airgun manufacturer that produces a wide range of high-velocity airguns, including the Hatsan Flash, which is a PCP airgun that is available in .177 and .22 caliber.

These are just a few examples of manufacturers that produce high velocity .177 or .22 caliber airguns, there are other reputable manufacturers that produce high velocity airguns as well. It’s important to choose an airgun that meets your specific needs, preferences and budget. Additionally, it’s important to check the laws and regulations of the area you are planning to use the airgun and make sure you comply with them.

What are some very popular .22LR rifles and what are the manufacturer and model names and what are some defining features or selling points of the rifles?

There are many popular .22LR rifles on the market, but here are a few examples of some well-known models and their defining features or selling points:

  1. Ruger 10/22: The Ruger 10/22 is a semi-automatic rifle made by Ruger and is one of the most popular .22LR rifles on the market. It is known for its reliability, accuracy, and ease of customization with aftermarket parts. It features a detachable rotary magazine and an easy to clean design.
  2. Marlin Model 60: The Marlin Model 60 is a semi-automatic rifle made by Marlin and is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a tubular magazine that holds up to 14 rounds and a cross-bolt safety.
  3. Remington 597: The Remington 597 is a semi-automatic rifle made by Remington and is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a detachable box magazine and a synthetic stock.
  4. CZ 455 (& 457): The CZ 455 and CZ 457 are bolt-action rifles made by CZ and is known for its accuracy and versatility. It features an adjustable trigger, a hammer-forged barrel and an easy-to-change barrel system that allows for multiple caliber conversions.
  5. Mossberg Plinkster: The Mossberg Plinkster is a semi-automatic rifle made by Mossberg and is known for its affordability and accuracy. It features a 21 inch barrel and a 10-round detachable magazine.

These are just a few examples of popular .22LR rifles, other manufacturers also produce a variety of .22LR rifles with different features and capabilities, it’s best to research and compare different models to find the one that best suits your needs, preferences and budget. Additionally, it’s important to check the laws and regulations of the area you are planning to use the rifle and make sure you comply with them.

What are some popular .22 LR pistols and handguns?

There are many popular .22 LR pistols and handguns on the market, but here are a few examples of some well-known models:

  1. Ruger Mark IV: The Ruger Mark IV is a semi-automatic pistol made by Ruger and is known for its accuracy, reliability and easy to use design. It features a one-button takedown for easy cleaning and a simple, one-finger cocking mechanism.
  2. Smith & Wesson Model 41: The Smith & Wesson Model 41 is a competition-grade semi-automatic pistol made by Smith & Wesson. It is known for its precision and accuracy and is popular among target shooters and competitors.
  3. Browning Buck Mark: The Browning Buck Mark is a semi-automatic pistol made by Browning and is known for its accuracy, ergonomic design, and easy to use features. It features an all-metal construction and a bull barrel.
  4. Walther P22: The Walther P22 is a semi-automatic pistol made by Walther and is known for its accuracy and ergonomic design. It features a polymer frame and a double-action trigger.
  5. Sig Sauer Mosquito: The Sig Sauer Mosquito is a semi-automatic pistol made by Sig Sauer and is known for its accuracy, reliability and easy to use design. It features a polymer frame and a double-action trigger.
  6. Beretta Neos: The Beretta Neos is a semi-automatic pistol made by Beretta and is known for its accuracy, reliability, and easy to use design. It features a polymer frame and a double-action trigger.

These are just a few examples of popular .22 LR pistols and handguns, other manufacturers also produce a variety of .22 LR pistols and handguns with different features and capabilities, it’s best to research and compare different models to find the one that best suits your needs, preferences, and budget. Additionally, it’s important to check the laws and regulations of the area you are planning to use the handgun and make sure you comply with them.

Which airguns can shoot a .177 pellet above 1000fps velocity?

There are many airguns that can shoot a .177 pellet above 1000fps velocity, but here are a few examples of some well-known models:

  1. Benjamin Marauder PCP Air Rifle: The Benjamin Marauder PCP Air Rifle is a pre-charged pneumatic (PCP) airgun that can shoot a .177 pellet at velocities of up to 1000fps. It is known for its accuracy and power.
  2. Gamo Hornet Maxxim: The Gamo Hornet Maxxim is a break-barrel airgun that can shoot a .177 pellet at velocities of up to 1000fps. It is known for its accuracy and power.
  3. Hatsan Flash: The Hatsan Flash is a PCP airgun that can shoot a .177 pellet at velocities of up to 1000fps. It is known for its accuracy and power.
  4. Air Arms S200: The Air Arms S200 is a PCP airgun that can shoot a .177 pellet at velocities of up to 1000fps. It is known for its accuracy and power.
  5. Weihrauch HW100: The Weihrauch HW100 is a PCP airgun that can shoot a .177 pellet at velocities of up to 1000fps. It is known for its accuracy and power.
  6. FX Impact X MKII: The FX Impact X MKII is a PCP airgun that can shoot a .177 pellet at velocities of up to 1000fps. It is known for its accuracy and power.

It’s important to note that the velocity of an airgun can vary depending on the type of pellet being used, the condition of the airgun, and the shooter’s skill level. Additionally, it’s important to check the laws and regulations of the area you are planning to use the airgun and make sure you comply with them, as some areas have laws and regulations regarding the use of high-powered airguns.

What are the best .22WMR firearms on the market? Makes, Models, Styles and approximate costs.

There are many .22WMR firearms on the market and the best one for you may depend on your specific needs and preferences. Here are a few examples of some well-known models and their approximate costs:

  1. Ruger 77/22: The Ruger 77/22 is a bolt-action rifle made by Ruger and is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a hardwood stock, a hammer-forged barrel and a rotary magazine. Approximate cost: $700
  2. Marlin Model 925: The Marlin Model 925 is a bolt-action rifle made by Marlin and is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a hardwood stock, a button-rifled barrel, and a 4-round magazine. Approximate cost: $300
  3. Thompson Center T/CR22: The Thompson Center T/CR22 is a semi-automatic rifle made by Thompson Center and is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a hardwood stock, a blued barrel and a 10-round magazine. Approximate cost: $350
  4. Henry Repeating Arms Golden Boy: The Henry Repeating Arms Golden Boy is a lever-action rifle made by Henry Repeating Arms and is known for its classic design and reliability. It features a hardwood stock, a blued barrel and a 16-round magazine. Approximate cost: $700
  5. Savage A22: The Savage A22 is a semi-automatic rifle made by Savage and is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a hardwood stock, a button-rifled barrel, and a 10-round magazine. Approximate cost: $400
  6. Kimber Rimfire Super: The Kimber Rimfire Super is a bolt-action rifle made by Kimber and is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a hardwood stock, a button-rifled barrel and a 5-round magazine. Approximate cost: $1000

These are just a few examples of popular .22WMR firearms, other manufacturers also produce a variety of .22WMR firearms with different features and capabilities, it’s best to research and compare different models to find the one that best suits your needs, preferences, and budget. 

What are the best in class .177 and .22 and .17 and .22LR firearms for hunting squirrels?

Here are a few examples of some firearms that are considered to be best in class for hunting squirrels in .177 and .22 caliber:

  1. Gamo Swarm Maxxim: The Gamo Swarm Maxxim is a .22 caliber break-barrel air rifle that is known for its accuracy, power, and fast follow-up shots. It features a 10-round rotary magazine, a synthetic stock, and an IGT (Inert Gas Technology) power plant. Approximate cost: $200
  2. RWS 34: The RWS 34 is a .177 caliber break-barrel air rifle that is known for its accuracy and power. It features a synthetic stock, a two-stage adjustable trigger, and a precision barrel. Approximate cost: $200
  3. Hatsan Mod 125: The Hatsan Mod 125 is a .22 caliber PCP (Pre-Charged Pneumatic) air rifle that is known for its accuracy and power. It features a synthetic stock, an adjustable trigger and a precision barrel. Approximate cost: $500
  4. Remington Model 597: The Remington Model 597 is a .22 LR semi-automatic rifle that is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a synthetic stock, a 10-round detachable magazine, and a precision barrel. Approximate cost: $300
  5. CZ-USA 455 American: The CZ-USA 455 American is a .22 LR bolt-action rifle that is known for its accuracy and reliability. It features a Turkish walnut stock, a 5-round detachable magazine and a precision barrel. Approximate cost: $500
  6. Ruger 10/22: The Ruger 10/22 is a .22 LR semi-automatic rifle that is known for its accuracy, reliability and customizability. It features a synthetic stock, a 10-round detachable magazine, and a precision barrel. Approximate cost: $300

It’s important to note that these are just a few examples of firearms that are considered to be best in class for hunting squirrels, other manufacturers also produce a variety of firearms with different features and capabilities, it’s best to research and compare different models to find the one that best suits your needs, preferences, and budget. Additionally, it’s important to check the laws and regulations of the area you are planning to use the firearms and make sure you comply with them.

Squirrel as food? When hunting to eat squirrel, which caliber or option makes the most sense? .177 vs. .22 for Squirrel

Isn’t it riskier to shoot such a small animal like a squirrel with a larger, faster, heavier projectile?

It’s true that using a larger, faster, and heavier projectile like a .22 caliber pellet to hunt squirrels could potentially result in more damage to the animal, especially if the shot is not precise. However, the increased kinetic energy and flatter trajectory of the .22 caliber pellets can make them a more reliable choice for taking down a squirrel with one shot, reducing the animal’s suffering and increasing the chances of a successful hunt.

Additionally, the larger and heavier .22 caliber pellets are less affected by wind drift and air resistance, which makes them more stable in flight and easier to hit the target accurately at longer distances.

It’s worth noting that both .177 and .22 caliber pellets can be used to hunt squirrels, and the choice ultimately comes down to personal preference and the intended use of the pellet gun. It’s also important to consider the local laws and regulations for hunting small game animals, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting.

With a .22 LR, is it generally easier and more efficient to hunt a squirrel with a rifle, versus a shotgun? What about for eating or prepping squirrel

Hunting squirrels with a .22 LR rifle can be more efficient than using a shotgun, as the rifle allows for more precise shot placement and can take down the animal with a single well-placed shot. A .22 LR rifle is a good choice for hunting squirrels as it’s a small caliber, has a flat trajectory and high accuracy, which allows for accurate shots at longer ranges. Additionally, the small caliber of the .22 LR bullet is less likely to damage the meat of the animal, which is important if you plan to eat the squirrel.

However, a shotgun can also be used to hunt squirrels, particularly if the squirrels are in trees or in thick vegetation where a rifle shot might be difficult. A shotgun can be used with birdshot, which has many small pellets that can hit a target with a wider spread. This can increase the chances of hitting the animal, but it also increases the chances of damaging the meat, and might require multiple shots to take the animal down.

When it comes to eating or prepping squirrel, it’s important to ensure that the animal is taken down humanely with a single, well-placed shot. This will minimize the damage to the meat and make it safer to eat. Additionally, it’s important to process and prepare the meat properly to ensure that it is safe to eat, and to follow any local laws and regulations regarding hunting and processing wild game.

Overall, whether you’re hunting squirrels with a .22 LR rifle or a shotgun, it’s important to consider the specific requirements of your hunting situation, the laws and regulations, and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the projectile.

From the Prepper Perspective: Some important things you should know about the .177 vs .22 regarding preps, survival, and general metrics important to preppers

How can preppers make the most of their budget when considering air guns instead of powder driven guns?

Preppers can make the most of their budget when considering air guns instead of powder-driven guns by taking the following steps:

  1. Research and compare: Research different types of airguns and compare them to powder-driven guns in terms of cost, power, noise, recoil, maintenance and reliability.
  2. Buy quality: Invest in a high-quality airgun that is well-suited to your needs, as this will be more cost-effective in the long run.
  3. Pellet types: Consider the different types of pellets available and choose the best one for your intended use.
  4. Accessories: Look for accessories such as scopes, bipods, and pellets that can help you make the most of your airgun.
  5. Practice: Practice your aim and shooting skills with the airgun to ensure that you are able to take down small game animals humanely.
  6. Maintenance: Take good care of the airgun, keep it clean and well-maintained, as this will help to ensure its longevity and reliability.
  7. Take into account laws and regulations: Make sure to know and abide by the laws and regulations regarding airguns in your area.
  8. Reusable: Airguns can be reusable, meaning that preppers can reload them with new pellets, and it can save them cost in the long term.

Isn’t an air rifle even more cost and resource self sufficient than a rimfire firearm?

An air rifle can be more cost and resource self-sufficient than a rimfire firearm in certain scenarios.

Cost: Air rifles tend to be less expensive than powder-driven rifles, both in terms of the initial cost of the gun and the cost of the ammunition. Air rifles typically use pellets, which are cheaper than traditional ammunition and can be reusable, making them a more cost-effective option in the long run. In addition, air rifles don’t require gunpowder, primers, or brass cases like rimfire firearms, which can help to keep the cost down.

Maintenance: Air rifles tend to be less complex than powder-driven rifles, which means that they are generally easier to maintain and repair. This can be an advantage in a resource-light scenario where tools and parts may be limited. Air rifles don’t require cleaning of the bore, chamber or other parts that are exposed to the combustion of the powder, like a rimfire firearm does.

Reliability: Air rifles are not as sensitive to extreme weather conditions or moisture as powder-driven rifles, which can make them more reliable in survival scenarios.

Power: Air rifles tend to have less power than powder-driven rifles, which means that they may not be as effective for taking down larger game animals. However, in a survival or prepper scenario, where small game animals like squirrels are more likely to be the main source of food, an air rifle can be a suitable choice.

In a resource-light scenario, where cost, maintenance, reliability, and power are important, an air rifle can be a more cost and resource self-sufficient choice over a rimfire firearm. However, it’s worth noting that the choice ultimately comes down to personal preference and the intended use of the rifle. Both types of rifles have their own advantages and disadvantages and it’s important to choose the one that best fits the specific scenario and needs.

What are the costs generally associated with .22LR shooting and hunting on a per shot basis?

The cost associated with .22LR shooting and hunting on a per shot basis can vary depending on a number of factors, such as the brand and quality of the ammunition, the quantity that is purchased, and the location. However, in general, .22LR ammunition can be found for as low as $0.05 per round, but can also be more expensive for premium brands.

When buying in bulk, the cost per round can decrease significantly. It’s also worth noting that prices can vary depending on the location, and prices may be higher in certain regions or at certain retail stores.

It’s worth noting that the cost of the ammunition is not the only cost associated with shooting and hunting with a .22 LR. Additional costs such as the cost of the firearm, the cost of any accessories or equipment, and the cost of any licenses or permits, should also be taken into account.

It’s important to keep in mind that while cost is an important factor to consider, it should not be the only factor when choosing a caliber or type of ammunition for shooting or hunting. Other factors such as the intended use of the projectile, the distance to the target, and the laws and regulations for hunting should also be taken into account.

Are there some distinct differences between an air rifle in .22, and a a powder driven .22 (LR)  rifles from the perspective of a survivalist, prepper, or someone on an extreme budget? What are the benefits in a resource light scenario, of using an air rifle over a rimfire rifle?

From the perspective of a survivalist, prepper, or someone on an extreme budget, there are some distinct differences between an air rifle in .22 caliber and a powder-driven .22 (LR) rifle.

Cost: Air rifles tend to be less expensive than powder-driven rifles, both in terms of the initial cost of the gun and the cost of the ammunition. Air rifles typically use pellets, which are cheaper than traditional ammunition and can be reusable, making them a more cost-effective option in the long run.

Noise: Air rifles tend to be much quieter than powder-driven rifles, which can be an advantage in a survival or prepper scenario where noise could attract unwanted attention.

Recoil: Air rifles tend to have less recoil than powder-driven rifles, which can make them more comfortable to shoot for extended periods of time.

Power: Air rifles tend to have less power than powder-driven rifles, which means that they may not be as effective for taking down larger game animals. However, in a survival or prepper scenario, where small game animals like squirrels are more likely to be the main source of food, an air rifle can be a suitable choice.

Maintenance: Air rifles tend to be less complex than powder-driven rifles, which means that they are generally easier to maintain and repair. This can be an advantage in a resource-light scenario where tools and parts may be limited.

Reliability: Air rifles are not as sensitive to extreme weather conditions or moisture as powder-driven rifles, which can make them more reliable in survival scenarios.

In a resource-light scenario, where cost, noise, recoil, power, maintenance and reliability are important, an air rifle can be a suitable choice over a powder-driven rifle. However, it’s worth noting that the choice ultimately comes down to personal preference and the intended use of the rifle. Both types of rifles have their own advantages and disadvantages and it’s important to choose the one that best fits the specific scenario and needs.

What are the general cost differences between a .22 air driven projectile and a .22LR? 

The general cost difference between a .22 caliber air driven projectile and a .22LR can vary depending on the brand, quantity and quality of the ammunition, as well as the location. However, in general, .22LR ammunition tends to be more expensive than .22 caliber airgun pellets.

.22 LR ammunition can be found for as low as $0.05 per round. Good luck with that lately though – as most of it is bought up as soon as there is a new delivery of stock to the retailer.

Generally, simple mass-produced lead pellets are significantly cheaper on average than any powder driven cartridge. This is due to manufacturing techniques and materials involved. It’s much more expensive to produce a powder driven cartridge compared to a simple lead pellet. Lead pellets take negligible machine time and have less total materials in them. A powder driven cartridge for instance, will have brass in the case, which requires a specialty machine to heat, form and finish; nitrates or other materials to make the primer, and powder; as well as a lead component. And typically a .22LR projectile is significantly heavier and requires about 2x the amount of materials to produce. Each component requires a different machine.

Lead pellets can be punched, casted or formed on a single machine in one, or a few operational cycles. It’s simply no comparison on cost generally.

On the other hand, precision-oriented. high-quality .22 caliber airgun pellets can cost around $0.10 to $0.20 per pellet. The cost of the pellets can also vary depending on the quantity, with larger quantities being less expensive per pellet – sometimes.

This is because of tolerance control, quality assurance checks, machine time, quality of materials and refinement of materials, etc.

It’s worth noting that the cost of the ammunition is not the only factor to consider when choosing between a .22 airgun pellet and a .22LR. Other factors such as the type of shooting, the intended use of the projectile, the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the laws and regulations for hunting small game animals should also be taken into account.

When people consider the lower cost of the .22LR for small game, why do they not consider the air rifle also? Especially since the air rifle projectiles are even significantly less than rimfire cartridge costs?

There are several reasons why people may not consider air rifles for small game hunting when considering the lower cost of .22 LR ammunition.

Power: Air rifles tend to have less power than powder-driven rifles, which means that they may not be as effective for taking down larger game animals or for hunting at longer ranges. This can make them less appealing to some people who are looking for a rifle that can take down small game animals quickly and humanely.

Noise: Air rifles tend to be much quieter than powder-driven rifles, which can be an advantage in some scenarios, but it can also make them less appealing to some people who are looking for a rifle that can make a loud report.

Recoil: Air rifles tend to have less recoil than powder-driven rifles, which can make them more comfortable to shoot for extended periods of time, but it can also make them less appealing to some people who are looking for a rifle that has a significant recoil.

Familiarity: Many people are more familiar with powder-driven rifles, and may not have experience with air rifles, which can make them less likely to consider them.

Perception: Air rifles are often seen as toys or plinking guns, rather than serious hunting weapons, which can make them less appealing to some people who are looking for a rifle that can be used for hunting.

It’s worth noting that while the cost of .22 LR ammunition is less than that of air rifle pellets, the cost difference is not significant. Additionally, air rifles can be a cost-effective option in the long run, as they are less expensive to purchase, and the pellets are reusable, which can make them a more cost-effective option in the long run. It’s important to consider all the factors before choosing the right rifle for the job, including cost, power, noise, recoil, familiarity and perception.

Why are airgun pellets and centerfire cartridges considered more reliable than the rimfire cartridges

Airgun pellets and centerfire cartridges are generally considered more reliable than rimfire cartridges for a few reasons:

  1. Priming method: Rimfire cartridges use a primer that is located in the rim of the cartridge case. When the firing pin strikes the rim, it crushes the primer and ignites the powder. This method of ignition is less reliable than the centerfire method, where the primer is located in the center of the cartridge case and is struck by the firing pin.
  2. Moisture sensitivity: Rimfire cartridges are more sensitive to moisture than centerfire cartridges. The primer in a rimfire cartridge is composed of a mixture of chemicals that can be affected by moisture, which can cause misfires or failure to fire. Centerfire cartridges are less affected by moisture because the primer is located in the center of the cartridge case and is protected by the bullet and the case.
  3. Durability: Rimfire cartridges are generally less durable than centerfire cartridges. Rimfire cartridges are often made of thin brass, which can be easily damaged or deformed. Centerfire cartridges are typically made of thicker brass or other durable materials, which makes them more resistant to damage and more reliable in the field.
  4. Power: Rimfire cartridges are not as powerful as centerfire cartridges, and this can affect their reliability. Rimfire cartridges are less powerful than centerfire cartridges and this can affect their reliability. For example, Rimfire cartridges are not as suitable for hunting larger game animals, as they may not have enough energy to humanely dispatch them.
  5. Airgun pellets, on the other hand, are less affected by moisture, pressure changes and are not susceptible to misfires, as they are not using a primer, and they are powered by compressed air or CO2. They are also less affected by temperature changes, and they are not sensitive to corrosion.

It’s worth noting that both rimfire and centerfire cartridges, as well as airgun pellets, can be reliable if they are stored, handled, and used properly. It’s always a good idea to use quality ammunition that is manufactured by reputable companies and to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations

Other more in-depth concepts about .177 vs. .22 for Squirrel

What are some typical sizes, weights and styles of .177 pellets?

.177 caliber pellets come in a variety of sizes, weights, and styles, each designed for different types of shooting. Some common types of .177 pellets include:

Diabolo pellets: These are the most common type of .177 pellets and are named for their shape, which is similar to a top or spinning toy. They have a pointed head and a hollow base, which makes them lightweight and allows them to be shot at high velocities. They come in a wide range of weights, from around 7 grains to 15 grains.

Wadcutter pellets: These pellets have a flat head, which makes them ideal for target shooting. They are designed to cut clean holes in paper targets, making it easier to see where the pellet hit. They are generally heavier than diabolo pellets, weighing around 14 to 16 grains.

Hollowpoint pellets: These pellets have a hollowed-out tip, which causes them to expand upon impact, creating a larger wound. They are typically used for hunting and pest control. They come in a range of weights from around 7 to 15 grains.

Round nose pellets: These pellets have a rounded head and are similar in shape to a traditional bullet. They are typically used for target shooting and plinking. They come in a range of weights from around 7 to 15 grains.

Pointed pellets: these have a pointed head and are similar in shape to diabolo pellets but they are designed to have a better penetration in the target. They are typically used for hunting and pest control. They come in a range of weights from around 7 to 15 grains.

It’s worth noting that different pellets can have a different effect in the target and the choice of pellet will depend on the intended use and personal preferences.

What are the basic differences between a .177 pellet and a .22 pellet from the perspective of everything other than the diameter?

The basic differences between a .177 and a .22 caliber pellet include:

Size and weight: The .22 caliber pellets are larger and heavier than the .177 pellets. This means that they have more kinetic energy when they hit the target and are more likely to deliver a more powerful impact.

Trajectory: The .22 caliber pellets have a flatter trajectory than the .177 pellets. This makes them easier to shoot accurately at longer distances, as they are less affected by wind drift and air resistance.

Penetration: .22 caliber pellets generally have a better penetration than .177 pellets. This is due to their larger size and weight, which allows them to retain more energy upon impact and deliver a more powerful strike.

Energy: .22 caliber pellets have a higher muzzle energy than .177 pellets. This makes them more suitable for hunting and pest control, as they can take down small game animals with one shot and are less likely to cause excessive damage to the animal.

Noise level: .22 caliber pellets can be louder than .177 pellets, particularly with high-powered pellet guns.

Recoil: .22 caliber pellets tend to have less recoil than .177 pellets, which can make them more comfortable to shoot for some people.

It’s worth noting that both .177 and .22 caliber pellets can be used for a variety of shooting activities, such as target shooting, plinking, and hunting small game animals, but the choice ultimately comes down to personal preference and the intended use of the pellet gun.

Are .177 or .22 pellets more accurate? are they just about the same? What is the general accuracy expectation up to 100 yards of these types of air driven projectiles?

Both .177 and .22 caliber pellets can be accurate, but the .22 caliber pellets are generally considered to be more accurate at longer distances. This is due to their flatter trajectory, which makes them less affected by wind drift and air resistance, and allows them to maintain a more stable flight path. Additionally, the larger and heavier .22 caliber pellets are less affected by small variations in the shooting conditions, such as slight changes in wind speed or direction, which can make them more consistent in their flight patterns.

The general accuracy expectation for .177 caliber pellets at 100 yards is around 1-1.5 inches groups. For .22 caliber pellets at 100 yards, the general accuracy expectation is around 0.75-1 inch groups. However, it is important to note that these numbers can vary depending on the specific pellet gun, the shooting conditions, and the skill level of the shooter.

It’s also worth noting that both .177 and .22 caliber pellets can be highly accurate with the right pellet gun, and the choice ultimately comes down to personal preference and the intended use of the pellet gun. Long range shooting with airguns is generally considered to be a challenging task that requires a good quality pellet gun, good pellets, and most importantly a shooter with good skills and experience.

What are the practical differences between a .177 air driven pellet, and a .22LR rimfire projectile from a lethality perspective with regards to ultra small game targets like a squirrel?’

From a lethality perspective, the main practical difference between a .177 air driven pellet and a .22LR rimfire projectile when it comes to ultra small game targets like squirrels is the kinetic energy and penetration of the projectile.

The .22 LR rimfire cartridge has a significantly more kinetic energy than a .177 caliber airgun pellet, which means that it will deliver a more powerful impact upon impact and has a greater potential for taking down the animal with one shot. Additionally, the .22 LR bullet is designed to expand upon impact, which creates a larger wound channel and increases the chances of a quick, humane kill.

On the other hand, the .177 caliber airgun pellet has a lower kinetic energy and it may not have enough power to take down a squirrel with one shot, also it may not have enough penetration to reach vital organs. It is also less likely to cause significant damage to the animal, making it more difficult to achieve a humane kill.

It’s worth noting that both .177 and .22 caliber projectiles can be used for hunting squirrels, but it’s important to consider the laws and regulations for hunting small game animals, and to make sure that you have the appropriate licenses and permits before hunting. Additionally, it’s important to use the appropriate caliber and style of projectile for the specific type of hunting, and to take into account factors such as the distance to the target, the size of the animal, and the intended use of the projectile.

How do big bore airguns compare to small caliber airguns, and more specifically can a big bore airgun compare favorably to a powder driven firearm? In what ways?

Big bore airguns and small caliber airguns have different characteristics and are suited for different purposes.

Big bore airguns, such as those that use .357, .45, and even .50 caliber pellets, are more powerful than small caliber airguns and can be used to take down larger game animals, such as deer, wild boar, and even bear. They typically have a higher muzzle energy and can deliver a more powerful impact on the target.

Small caliber airguns, such as those that use .177 or .22 caliber pellets, are typically used for small game hunting, pest control, and target shooting. They have a lower muzzle energy and are less powerful than big bore airguns, but are still capable of taking down small game animals like squirrels, rabbits, and birds.

Comparing big bore airguns to powder-driven firearms, they can compare favorably in certain scenarios. For example, big bore airguns can be more cost-effective over the long run, as they don’t require gunpowder, primers, or brass cases, which can help to keep the cost down. Additionally, they tend to be less complex than powder-driven firearms, which means that they are generally easier to maintain and repair. They are also quieter and have less recoil than powder-driven firearms, which can be an advantage in certain scenarios.

However, it’s worth noting that big bore airguns typically have less power and range than powder-driven firearms, which means that they may not be as effective for taking down larger game animals or for hunting at longer ranges. Additionally, laws and regulations for hunting big game with airguns vary by state and country and in many cases, it’s illegal.

In general, the choice between a big bore airgun or a powder-driven firearm will depend on the specific requirements of the hunting or shooting scenario, the laws and regulations, and the intended use of the projectile.

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