44 Special vs. 44 Magnum – The most comprehensive guide ever including FAQ’s

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What are some details about .44 Special vs. .44 Magnum including some basic ballistic information and pressures, load types and other assorted information for the difference between a .44 Special and a .44 magnum?

The .44 Special and .44 Magnum are both centerfire handgun cartridges with a caliber of .44 inches. However, they have some significant differences in terms of their design and performance.

A base note: The .44 Magnum is the same as the .44 Rem Mag, and is unofficially a 10.9x33mmR. All of these cartridges are interchangeable, and the .44 Special can generally be shot in most guns chambered in these chamberings. However you SHOULD NOT attempt to shoot any of these cartridges in a chamber marked for ONLY .44 Special.

The .44 Special was introduced in 1907 and was designed to be a more powerful version of the .44 S&W American cartridge. It is a rimmed, straight-walled cartridge that is typically loaded with bullets weighing between 200 and 300 grains. It can generate muzzle velocities of around 750-900 feet per second and muzzle energies of around 400-550 foot-pounds, depending on the specific load.

The .44 Magnum, on the other hand, was introduced in 1955 and was designed to be a much more powerful cartridge than the .44 Special. It is a rimmed, bottlenecked cartridge that is typically loaded with bullets weighing between 240 and 300 grains. It can generate muzzle velocities of around 1,000-1,400 feet per second and muzzle energies of around 700-1,200 foot-pounds, depending on the specific load.

In terms of their ballistic performance, the .44 Magnum is significantly more powerful than the .44 Special. It has a higher muzzle velocity, a higher muzzle energy, and can effectively shoot at longer ranges. However, the .44 Special is generally considered to be more suitable for target shooting and plinking due to its lower recoil and less dramatic muzzle blast.

In terms of load types, both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum are available in a variety of bullet types, including full metal jacket, hollow point, and soft point. They can be used for a variety of purposes, including self-defense, hunting, and target shooting.

What does the use case landscape look like for the .44 Magnum and the .44 Special?

In recent years, the .44 Magnum has dropped in popularity for self defense as most users feel it’s overpowered, harder to handle, and doesn’t offer enough optimization – at least for a CCW or carry weapon. For home protection and ranch/Homestead use, the .44 Magnum remains popular, especially since it offers compatibility between long guns (lever actions) and handguns, while offering excellent stopping power (enough for even many big game species, predators and feral hogs).

The .44 Special has found intense adoption in sporting uses like Cowboy Action Shooting, and Old West style tournaments, as well as for range duty because of reduced cost, and similar experience to other .44’s like the Magnum. 

Here are 15 points of information about the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges including some on how they differ:

  • The .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges are both large-caliber handgun cartridges that are known for their high stopping power.
  • Both cartridges are based on the same case design, and they share many of the same physical characteristics, including caliber, case length, and bullet diameter.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge is a high-pressure cartridge that was developed as a more powerful version of the .44 Special cartridge. The .44 Special is a relatively low-pressure cartridge.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge is generally considered to be more powerful and capable of generating higher velocities and muzzle energies than the .44 Special cartridge.
  • Both cartridges are commonly used for handgun hunting, self-defense, and target shooting.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge is generally considered to be more suitable for hunting large or dangerous game than the .44 Special cartridge, due to its higher power and longer effective range.
  • The .44 Special cartridge is generally considered to be more suitable for self-defense and target shooting than the .44 Magnum cartridge, due to its lower recoil and better control.
  • Both cartridges are widely available from a range of manufacturers, and they are used in a wide range of firearms, including revolvers and semi-automatic pistols.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge is not as widely used for self-defense as the .357 Magnum cartridge, and it is not as widely available from manufacturers as the .357 Magnum.
  • Both cartridges are known for their high stopping power and relatively large caliber, which make them suitable for use against larger or more heavily-armored targets.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge is generally considered to be more suitable for long-range shooting than the .44 Special cartridge, due to its higher power and longer effective range.
  • Both cartridges are popular among handgun shooters and are produced in large quantities. It is likely that several million rounds of each cartridge are produced each year.
  • Both cartridges have been used in a number of famous Hollywood movies and TV shows, including “Dirty Harry,” “Magnum, P.I.” and “The Walking Dead.”
  • The .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges have a long and storied history, and they have been used by shooters and hunters for over a century.

Firearms manufactured in the .44 Special vs. .44 Magnum

What are some mainstream guns on the market that are chambered in these cartridges by manufacturer and model?

There are a number of mainstream firearms that are chambered in the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges, including both handguns and long guns. Here are some examples of firearms that are chambered in these cartridges, organized by manufacturer:

Handguns:

  • Smith & Wesson: Model 29 (44 Magnum), Model 629 (44 Magnum), Model 625 (44 Special)
  • Ruger: Super Redhawk (44 Magnum), Redhawk (44 Magnum), Blackhawk (44 Special)
  • Taurus: Raging Bull (44 Magnum), Tracker (44 Magnum), 44 (44 Special)
  • Freedom Arms: Model 83 (44 Magnum)

Long guns:

  • Marlin: 1894 (44 Magnum, 44 Special)
  • Henry: Big Boy (44 Magnum, 44 Special)
  • Rossi: R92 (44 Magnum, 44 Special)
  • Uberti: 1873 (44 Magnum, 44 Special)

This is by no means an exhaustive list, and there are many other firearms that are chambered in these cartridges that are available on the market. It is worth noting that the specific models and features of these firearms can vary significantly, and it is important for shooters to carefully consider their specific needs and preferences when selecting a firearm chambered in the .44 Special or .44 Magnum.

Which Modern Single Action Army style firearms are currently produced in any .44 caliber cartridge? By name and manufacturer please

There are a number of modern Single Action Army (SAA) style firearms that are currently produced in a .44 caliber cartridge. Here are a few examples:

  • The Colt Single Action Army revolver is one of the most famous SAA style firearms and is currently produced in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum, .44 Special, and .44-40.
  • The Ruger New Model Super Blackhawk revolver is a modern SAA style firearm that is currently produced in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.
  • The Uberti Single Action Army revolver is a modern reproduction of the Colt Single Action Army revolver that is currently produced in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum, .44 Special, and .44-40.
  • The Freedom Arms Model 83 revolver is a high-quality, single-action revolver that is currently produced in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum, .44 Special, and .44-40.

Which Double action revolvers are currently produced in either of these calibers, or any other .44 diameter projectile chambering?

There are a number of double action revolvers that are currently produced in the .44 Magnum, .44 Special, and other .44 caliber chamberings. Here are a few examples:

  • The Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver is a classic double action revolver that is chambered in .44 Magnum and is known for its high stopping power and long effective range.
  • The Ruger Super Redhawk revolver is a double action revolver that is chambered in .44 Magnum and is known for its high stopping power and long effective range.
  • The Taurus Raging Bull revolver is a double action revolver that is chambered in .44 Magnum and is known for its high stopping power and long effective range.
  • The S&W Model 629 revolver is a double action revolver that is chambered in .44 Magnum and is known for its high stopping power and long effective range.

Are there any production semi-automatic handguns or long guns that are chambered in either .44 Magnum or .44 Special?

Yes, there are a number of production semi-automatic handguns and long guns that are chambered in the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges. Here are a few examples:

  • The Thompson/Center Contender pistol is a single shot, break action pistol that is chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.
  • The Desert Eagle pistol is a semi-automatic handgun that is chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.
  • The Ruger Redhawk revolver is a double action revolver that is chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.
  • The Smith & Wesson Model 629 revolver is a double action revolver that is chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.

Can you name all of the mainstream lever action firearms that are chambered in .44 of any type?

There are a number of mainstream lever action firearms that are chambered in .44 caliber cartridges. Here are a few examples:

  • The Winchester Model 1873 rifle was one of the most famous lever action firearms of the Old West and was chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44-40. The Model 1873 rifle is still popular with collectors and shooters today.
  • The Marlin Model 1894 rifle is a modern lever action rifle that is chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.
  • The Rossi R92 rifle is a modern lever action rifle that is chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.
  • The Henry Big Boy rifle is a modern lever action rifle that is chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44 Magnum and .44 Special.

What is a typical twist rate for these cartridges on both a handgun and a long gun?

The typical twist rate for the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges can vary significantly depending on the specific firearm and the specific load that is being used. Here are some general guidelines for twist rates on firearms chambered in these cartridges:

  • Handguns: The typical twist rate for handguns chambered in the .44 Special and .44 Magnum can range from 1:16 inches to 1:20 inches, depending on the specific firearm and the specific load that is being used. A faster twist rate (such as 1:16 inches) may be more suitable for shooting heavier bullets or for shooting at longer ranges, while a slower twist rate (such as 1:20 inches) may be more suitable for shooting lighter bullets or for shooting at shorter ranges.
  • Long guns: The typical twist rate for long guns chambered in the .44 Special and .44 Magnum can range from 1:20 inches to 1:32 inches, depending on the specific firearm and the specific load that is being used. A faster twist rate (such as 1:20 inches) may be more suitable for shooting heavier bullets or for shooting at longer ranges, while a slower twist rate (such as 1:32 inches) may be more suitable for shooting lighter bullets or for shooting at shorter ranges.

It is worth noting that the specific twist rate that is required for a particular load will depend on a number of factors, including the bullet weight, the bullet length, and the desired accuracy and velocity. It is important for shooters to consult a reloading manual or online resources to determine the appropriate twist rate for their specific loads, taking into account these and other factors.

Is the .44 special used in cowboy action shooting?

Yes, the .44 Special is a popular cartridge for cowboy action shooting, which is a competitive shooting sport that involves shooting replica firearms from the mid- to late 1800s. In cowboy action shooting, competitors typically use firearms chambered in cartridges that were popular during the time period that the sport is meant to simulate, which includes the .44 Special.

The .44 Special is well-suited for cowboy action shooting due to its relatively low recoil and relatively mild muzzle blast, which make it more comfortable to shoot and easier to handle than some of the more powerful handgun cartridges. It is also capable of producing good accuracy and sufficient power for the types of targets typically used in cowboy action shooting.

It is worth noting that the .44 Magnum is also sometimes used in cowboy action shooting, but it is generally considered to be too powerful for some of the more formal categories of the sport, and it is typically only used in informal or “wild bunch” categories that allow for more powerful cartridges.

What types of loads would be used for such a purpose?

In cowboy action shooting, competitors typically use light to medium loads in their .44 Special cartridges, as these are more suitable for the types of targets typically used in the sport and produce less recoil and muzzle blast than heavier loads.

Some common load types that are used in cowboy action shooting include:

  • Lead round nose (LRN) bullets: These are basic, full metal jacket bullets with a round nose shape. They are inexpensive and widely available, and they are suitable for shooting paper and steel targets.
  • Wadcutter bullets: These are bullets with a flat front and a sharp edge around the circumference. They are designed to cut clean, round holes in paper targets, making them easier to score. They are generally not suitable for shooting steel targets, as they may not produce sufficient energy to knock over the steel targets.
  • Semi-wadcutter (SWC) bullets: These are bullets with a partial wadcutter shape and a sharp edge around the circumference. They combine some of the benefits of wadcutters (such as clean-cutting holes in paper targets) with better performance on steel targets.
  • Soft point (SP) bullets: These are bullets with a soft lead tip that is designed to expand upon impact, producing a larger wound channel and transferring more energy to the target. They are suitable for shooting paper and steel targets and are often used for hunting and self-defense.

It is worth noting that the specific load type that is used will depend on the specific goals and preferences of the shooter, as well as the rules and regulations of the specific cowboy action shooting event.

How much grain weight and what type of powder would I want to use for .44 Special if I were tailoring a load for cowboy action shooting?

The specific grain weight and type of powder that you will want to use for your .44 Special loads will depend on a number of factors, including the type of bullet you are using, the desired velocity and accuracy, and the type of firearm you are using. It is important to consult a reloading manual or online resources to determine the appropriate reloading parameters for your specific load, taking into account these and other factors.

That being said, for cowboy action shooting, you will typically want to use a light to medium load in your .44 Special cartridges, as these are more suitable for the types of targets used in the sport and produce less recoil and muzzle blast than heavier loads. A bullet weight of around 200-240 grains is generally a good range for cowboy action shooting, and you will want to use a powder that is suitable for the bullet weight and produces consistent results.

Some popular powders for .44 Special loads include Alliant Unique, Alliant 2400, Vihtavuori N320, and Accurate No. 9. It is important to note that the specific powder and charge weight that you use will depend on the specific goals and preferences of the shooter, as well as the rules and regulations of the specific cowboy action shooting event.

Ammunition Availability for the .44 Special vs. .44 Magnum

Which manufacturers and which sub brands of ammunition are available for these cartridges by name?

There are a number of manufacturers and sub-brands of ammunition that are available for the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges. Here are some examples of manufacturers and sub-brands of ammunition that are available for these cartridges, organized by cartridge type:

  • .44 Special:
    • Federal: Hydra-Shok, American Eagle
    • Hornady: Critical Defense, Critical Duty
    • Remington: Golden Saber, UMC
    • Winchester: Super-X, USA
    • Magtech: Guardian Gold, First Defense
    • Cor-Bon: DPX, Glaser
  • .44 Magnum:
    • Federal: Hydra-Shok, American Eagle
    • Hornady: Critical Defense, Critical Duty
    • Remington: Golden Saber, UMC
    • Winchester: Super-X, USA
    • Magtech: Guardian Gold, First Defense
    • Cor-Bon: DPX, Glaser

This is by no means an exhaustive list, and there are many other manufacturers and sub-brands of ammunition that are available for these cartridges. It is worth noting that the specific types and features of the ammunition that are available can vary significantly between different manufacturers and sub-brands, and it is important for shooters to carefully consider their specific needs and preferences when selecting ammunition.

Hunting information for the .44 Special vs. .44 Magnum

When choosing either of these cartridges for hunting purposes, whether in a lever action or a handgun, or even another platform, what types of animals would be an ideal fit for each of the cartridges?

The .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are both suitable for hunting a variety of medium to large game animals, depending on the specific load that is used. However, they are generally best suited for hunting animals that are within their effective range, which is typically 50-100 yards for the .44 Special and 75-125 yards for the .44 Magnum, depending on the specific load.

In terms of specific animals, the .44 Special is generally suitable for hunting medium-sized game animals such as deer, hogs, and black bear, provided that the shooter uses an appropriate load and shots placement. The .44 Magnum is generally suitable for hunting larger game animals such as elk, moose, and bison, as well as for hunting dangerous game such as bear and cape buffalo, provided that the shooter uses an appropriate load and shots placement.

It is worth noting that the specific load that is used will have a significant impact on the performance of the cartridge and the suitability of the cartridge for hunting specific animals. For example, a soft point bullet or a bonded bullet may be more suitable for hunting medium to large game animals due to their ability to produce a large wound channel and transfer a lot of energy to the target, while a full metal jacket bullet may not be as suitable due to its lack of expansion.

What is the general effective lethal range for the .44 Special on a mid sized game animal target?

The effective lethal range for the .44 Special cartridge on a mid-sized game animal target will depend on a number of factors, including the specific load that is used, the type of bullet that is used, the shooting angle, and the size and anatomy of the animal.

In general, the .44 Special is a medium-power cartridge that is best suited for shooting at ranges of 50-75 yards or less, depending on the specific load and the specific shooting scenario. At these ranges, the .44 Special is capable of delivering sufficient energy to the target to produce a humane kill on a mid-sized game animal such as a deer, hog, or black bear, provided that the shooter uses an appropriate load and places the shot accurately.

It is worth noting that the .44 Special is not a long-range cartridge, and it will experience a significant drop in velocity and energy at ranges beyond 75 yards. This can make it less suitable for shooting at longer ranges, particularly on larger game animals.

What is the maximum effective range for lethality on a .44 Magnum when handgun hunting, generally?

The maximum effective range for lethality on a .44 Magnum cartridge when handgun hunting will depend on a number of factors, including the specific load that is used, the type of bullet that is used, the shooting angle, and the size and anatomy of the animal.

In general, the .44 Magnum is a high-power cartridge that is capable of delivering significant energy to the target and is suitable for handgun hunting at ranges of 75-125 yards or less, depending on the specific load and the specific shooting scenario. At these ranges, the .44 Magnum is capable of delivering sufficient energy to the target to produce a humane kill on a variety of medium to large game animals, such as elk, moose, bison, and bear, provided that the shooter uses an appropriate load and places the shot accurately.

It is worth noting that the .44 Magnum is not a long-range cartridge, and it will experience a significant drop in velocity and energy at ranges beyond 125 yards. This can make it less suitable for shooting at longer ranges, particularly on larger game animals.

What type of accuracy is generally considered acceptable for each of these cartridges at 50 feet?

The accuracy that is generally considered acceptable for the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges at 50 feet will depend on a number of factors, including the specific load that is used, the type of bullet that is used, the type of firearm that is used, and the specific shooting scenario.

In general, the .44 Special and .44 Magnum are capable of producing good accuracy at close range, provided that the shooter uses high-quality components and a firearm that is in good condition. With a good load and a well-tuned firearm, it is possible to achieve groups of 2-3 inches or less at 50 feet with these cartridges.

That being said, it is worth noting that accuracy can vary significantly between different loads and firearms, and it is important for shooters to carefully consider their specific goals and preferences when selecting a load and a firearm for shooting at close range.

Will a longer barrel improve the ballistics of either of these cartridges?

A longer barrel can improve the ballistics of the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges in a number of ways. Here are a few specific ways in which a longer barrel can impact the ballistics of these cartridges:

  • Velocity: A longer barrel can generally provide a longer, more stable platform for the burning powder to act upon the bullet, resulting in higher muzzle velocities. As a result, a longer barrel can generally produce higher velocities with the .44 Special and .44 Magnum, especially with heavier bullets.
  • Accuracy: A longer barrel can provide a longer, more stable sight radius, which can help to improve accuracy by making it easier for the shooter to align the sights consistently. A longer barrel can also reduce the amount of barrel whip or vibration that occurs during the bullet’s passage through the barrel, which can help to improve accuracy by reducing the amount of disturbance that is imparted to the bullet.
  • Sight radius: A longer barrel can provide a longer sight radius, which can make it easier for the shooter to aim and make shots at longer ranges.

That being said, it is worth noting that the specific impact of a longer barrel on the ballistics of the .44 Special and .44 Magnum will depend on a number of factors, including the specific load that is used, the type of bullet that is used, and the specific firearm that is used. It is important for shooters to carefully consider these and other factors when selecting a barrel length for their firearm.

Which animals are suitable to be hunted by these cartridges?

The .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are capable of taking a wide range of medium to large game animals, depending on the specific load that is being used and the specific characteristics of the animal.

Here are some examples of animals that are suitable to be hunted with the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges:

  • .44 Special:
    • Medium-sized game animals, such as deer, wild boar, and black bear
    • Smaller game animals, such as raccoons, opossums, and foxes
  • .44 Magnum:
    • Large game animals, such as elk, moose, and grizzly bear
    • Medium-sized game animals, such as deer, wild boar, and black bear
    • Smaller game animals, such as raccoons, opossums, and foxes can be killed with this round, but the load is likely to be overpowered for anything other than dispatching a nuisance animal

Is there any state on record that allows hunting with these cartridges for deer?

It is difficult to determine whether there are any specific states that allow hunting with the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges for deer, as hunting regulations can vary significantly from one state to another. This is primarily because legislation changes frequently and the adoption or removal of cartridges and scenarios for hunting occurs seasonally more often than not, at least at some level.

In the United States, hunting regulations are typically established and enforced by state wildlife agencies, and these agencies have the authority to determine which firearms and cartridges are suitable for hunting different types of game animals within their jurisdiction. As a result, the specific hunting regulations that apply to the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges can vary significantly from one state to another.

In general, the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are considered to be suitable for hunting a wide range of medium to large game animals, depending on the specific load that is being used and the specific characteristics of the animal. As a result, it is likely that both of these cartridges are allowed for hunting deer in at least some states.

I recommend that you consult with your state wildlife agency or check the hunting regulations for your state to determine which firearms and cartridges are suitable for hunting deer in your area. This will help you to understand the specific hunting regulations that apply to the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges in your state, and to ensure that you are in compliance with these regulations when hunting.

At the time of this article being published there is reason to believe that you can hunt typical moderate/big game with a .44 Magnum at least under certain circumstances in most states (please verify this information with you specific jurisdiction as this type of information goes out of date regularly). This may not be the case every time with handguns, though, if a state allows big game hunting with a handgun, it is more than likely to include the .44 Magnum. 

Self Defense information for the .44 Special vs. .44 Magnum

Is the .44 Special a satisfactory self defense round for someone who cannot handle the big recoil of a .44 Magnums?

The .44 Special cartridge is generally considered to be a satisfactory self-defense round for someone who cannot handle the recoil of a .44 Magnum. The .44 Special is a medium-power cartridge that is capable of producing good accuracy and performance when used with high-quality components and firearms, and it produces significantly less recoil than the .44 Magnum.

The .44 Special is generally considered to be a good choice for self-defense because it is capable of delivering sufficient energy to the target to produce legitimate stopping power for most situations, while at the same time producing less recoil than the .44 Magnum, which can make it easier for shooters to handle and control.

That being said, it is worth noting that the .44 Special is not as powerful as the .44 Magnum, and it may not be suitable for use against larger, more heavily armored targets or for shooting at longer ranges. It is important for shooters to carefully consider their specific needs and preferences when selecting a self-defense cartridge, and to choose a cartridge that is suitable for their specific shooting scenario.

In a self-defense scenario, it is generally desirable to use a cartridge that is capable of producing a “humane kill” or better termed: “sufficient stopping power” quickly and efficiently, in order to stop the threat as quickly as possible and minimize the risk of injury to innocent bystanders. The term “humane kill” is generally relegated to the hunting world and refers to animals, but similarly, when stopping a human attacker or threat, you would want to also maintain enough power to stop the threat completely, and to avoid after effects subsequent to the engagement with live fire.

Using a cartridge that is capable of producing sufficient stopping power without being overpowered, means that the cartridge is capable of delivering sufficient energy to the target to cause a rapid and irreversible incapacitation. This can be important in a self-defense scenario because it can help to reduce the risk of injury or death to the defender and to minimize the risk of injury or death to innocent bystanders (from factors like overpenetration or second target hits).

It is worth noting that the specific amount of energy that is required to stop an attacker will depend on a number of factors, including the size and anatomy of the target, the type of bullet that is being used, and the specific shooting scenario. It is important for shooters to carefully consider these and other factors when selecting a self-defense cartridge, and to choose a cartridge that is capable of producing sufficient stopping power under the specific circumstances that they may encounter.

Will the amount of powder in either of these loads be difficult for maintaining night vision capabilities in low light scenarios where they may be used for self defense in a home invasion scenario?

The amount of powder in a load for the .44 Special or .44 Magnum cartridge is not likely to significantly affect a shooter’s night vision capabilities in a low-light self-defense scenario, such as a home invasion. This is not a guarantee, as either round still has an excess of powder for a typically sized home in low light conditions. Using a flashlight can help to improve this, of course.

When a cartridge is fired, the flame from the burning powder is generally contained within the barrel of the firearm and is not directly visible to the shooter – under most lighting scenarios. As a result, the amount of powder in the load is not likely to produce a significant amount of light that would affect the shooter’s night vision, unless the shots are fired in rapid succession under extremely dark conditions, without ambient light sources having influence on the space.

That being said, it is worth noting that the muzzle flash produced by a firearm can affect a shooter’s night vision, especially in low-light conditions. Muzzle flash is the brief burst of light that is produced when the bullet exits the barrel of the firearm, and it can be caused by a variety of factors, including the type of powder that is being used, the type of bullet that is being used, and the specific load that is being used.

In general, self-defense loads that are designed for use in low-light conditions are typically formulated to produce a minimal amount of muzzle flash, in order to minimize the impact on the shooter’s night vision. It is important for shooters to carefully consider the specific characteristics of the loads that they are using, and to choose loads that are suitable for their specific needs and preferences.

What are the important ballistic, pressure, loading, sizing and reloading information I should know about the .44 Special vs. .44 Magnum? 

What are the SAAMI specifications for each of these cartridges?

SAAMI (the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) is an industry organization that establishes standards for firearms and ammunition. The SAAMI specifications for the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are as follows:

.44 Special:

  • Cartridge overall length (COL): 1.16 inches
  • Maximum average pressure (MAP): 17,000 psi

.44 Magnum:

  • Cartridge overall length (COL): 1.61 inches
  • Maximum average pressure (MAP): 36,000 psi

It is important to note that these are the maximum average pressure levels that are recommended by SAAMI for these cartridges. Loads that exceed these pressure levels may be unsafe and could result in damage to the firearm or injury to the shooter. It is important for reloaders to consult a reloading manual or online resources to determine the appropriate load pressure for their specific loads, taking into account the specific components that they are using and the type of firearm that they are using.

What are some typical costs for these cartridges and the reloading components?

The costs of .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges and reloading components can vary significantly depending on a number of factors, including the specific load that is being used, the quality of the components, and the availability of the components. Here are some general guidelines for the costs of these cartridges and components:

  • Cartridges: Factory-loaded .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges can cost anywhere from $0.50 to $1.50 or more per round, depending on the specific load and the quantity that is being purchased.
  • Reloading components: The costs of reloading components for the .44 Special and .44 Magnum can vary significantly, but here are some general estimates for the costs of some common reloading components:
  • Brass: $0.10-$0.30 per piece
  • Powder: $20-$40 per pound
  • Primers: $0.05-$0.10 per piece
  • Bullets: $0.15-$0.50 per piece

It is worth noting that these are just general estimates, and the actual costs of reloading components can vary significantly depending on the specific components that are being used and the availability of the components.

Between the many manufacturers that produce loads in these two cartridges, what are the general load specifications with regards to velocity, muzzle energy and down range energy, as well as drop and trajectory?

The load specifications for .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges can vary significantly between different manufacturers, as different companies use different bullet weights, powders, and load pressures to achieve different performance characteristics.

In general, the .44 Special cartridge can generate muzzle velocities of around 750-900 feet per second and muzzle energies of around 400-550 foot-pounds, depending on the specific load. At longer ranges, the .44 Special will experience a significant drop in velocity and energy, and it may not be suitable for shooting at ranges beyond 50-75 yards.

The .44 Magnum cartridge, on the other hand, can generate significantly higher muzzle velocities of around 1,000-1,400 feet per second and muzzle energies of around 700-1,200 foot-pounds, depending on the specific load. At longer ranges, the .44 Magnum will still experience a significant drop in velocity and energy, but it may be suitable for shooting at ranges beyond 75-100 yards, depending on the specific load and the specific shooting scenario.

It is important to note that the specific load specifications for .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges can vary significantly between different manufacturers and different loads, and it is essential for shooters to carefully consider the specific performance characteristics of the loads that they are using to ensure that they are suitable for their intended purpose.

What are the full details of each of these cartridges from a total measurement perspective – what are there exact characteristics on all measurable facets?

The .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are rimmed, centerfire cartridges that are commonly used for handgun shooting and hunting. Both cartridges are based on the same case design, and they share many of the same physical characteristics. Here are some of the key physical characteristics of these cartridges:

  • .44 Special:
    • Case length: 1.16 inches
    • Overall length: 1.61 inches
    • Rim diameter: 0.514 inches
    • Case capacity: 38.3 grains
    • Maximum pressure: 15,500 psi
  • .44 Magnum:
    • Case length: 1.29 inches
    • Overall length: 1.60 inches
    • Rim diameter: 0.514 inches
    • Case capacity: 47.5 grains
    • Maximum pressure: 36,000 psi

It is worth noting that these are just some of the key physical characteristics of these cartridges, and there are many other factors that can affect the performance and capabilities of these cartridges, including the specific load that is being used, the type of bullet that is being used, and the specific firearm that is being used.

How long with a brass cartridge case be usable for if continuously reloaded with these rimmed cartridges?

The lifespan of a brass cartridge case that is continuously reloaded with .44 Special or .44 Magnum cartridges can vary significantly depending on a number of factors, including the specific load that is being used, the quality of the brass, the care and maintenance of the brass, and the specific reloading process that is being used.

In general, brass cartridge cases that are continuously reloaded with these rimmed cartridges can be usable for many reloading cycles, potentially dozens or even hundreds of cycles, depending on the specific circumstances. However, it is important for reloaders to carefully inspect their brass for signs of wear or damage, and to retire any brass that shows signs of excessive wear or damage.

Here are some general guidelines for the lifespan of brass cartridge cases that are continuously reloaded with .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges:

  • .44 Special: The .44 Special is a relatively low-pressure cartridge, and brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with .44 Special loads are generally expected to last for many reloading cycles. In general, brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with .44 Special loads can be usable for dozens or even hundreds of reloading cycles, depending on the specific load and the specific brass that is being used.
  • .44 Magnum: The .44 Magnum is a high-pressure cartridge, and brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with .44 Magnum loads may not have as long of a lifespan as brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with .44 Special loads. In general, brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with .44 Magnum loads can be usable for several dozen reloading cycles, depending on the specific load and the specific brass that is being used.

It is worth noting that these are just general guidelines, and the actual lifespan of brass cartridge cases that are continuously reloaded with .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges can vary significantly depending on the specific circumstances. It is important for reloaders to carefully inspect their brass and to retire any brass that shows signs of excessive wear or damage.

How many times can a .44 Magnum cartridge be resized, generally?

The number of times that a .44 Magnum cartridge can be resized generally depends on the specific brass that is being used, the specific reloading process that is being used, and the care and maintenance of the brass. In general, brass cartridge cases that are continuously reloaded with .44 Magnum loads can be resized several dozen times, depending on the specific circumstances.

It is worth noting that the .44 Magnum is a high-pressure cartridge, and brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with .44 Magnum loads may not have as long of a lifespan as brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with lower-pressure cartridges. As a result, brass cartridge cases that are continuously reloaded with .44 Magnum loads may show signs of wear or damage more quickly than brass cartridge cases that are reloaded with lower-pressure cartridges.

In order to maximize the lifespan of brass cartridge cases that are continuously reloaded with .44 Magnum loads, it is important for reloaders to carefully inspect their brass and to retire any brass that shows signs of excessive wear or damage. It is also important to use a high-quality reloading process and to follow all safety and maintenance guidelines when reloading brass cartridge cases with .44 Magnum loads.

History, Pop-culture, and interesting information about the .44 Special vs. .44 Magnum

Can you give me some basic history about the modern .44’s

The .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are two closely-related handgun cartridges that have a long and interesting history. Here is a brief overview of the history of each cartridge:

.44 Special:

The .44 Special cartridge was developed in the early 20th century as a more powerful alternative to the popular .44 S&W Russian cartridge. The .44 Special was designed to be used in revolvers, and it was initially chambered in a number of popular revolver models, including the Smith & Wesson New Century and the Colt Single Action Army.

One of the key features of the .44 Special cartridge was its relatively low pressure, which made it suitable for use in a wide range of revolvers and reduced the risk of damaging the firearm or causing injury to the shooter. The .44 Special quickly gained popularity among shooters and law enforcement agencies, and it became one of the most widely-used handgun cartridges of the 20th century.

Over the years, the .44 Special has been used for a wide range of shooting applications, including self-defense, hunting, and target shooting. It is known for its relatively large caliber and high stopping power, which make it suitable for use against larger or more heavily-armored targets.

.44 Magnum:

The .44 Magnum cartridge was developed in the mid-20th century as a more powerful version of the .44 Special cartridge. The .44 Magnum was designed to be used in revolvers, and it was initially chambered in a number of popular revolver models, including the Smith & Wesson Model 29 and the Colt Anaconda.

One of the key features of the .44 Magnum cartridge was its high pressure, which made it one of the most powerful handgun cartridges of its time. The .44 Magnum was initially marketed as a hunting cartridge, and it quickly gained popularity among hunters and recreational shooters.

Over the years, the .44 Magnum has been used for a wide range of shooting applications, including self-defense, hunting, and target shooting. It is known for its relatively large caliber and high stopping power, which make it suitable for use against larger or more heavily-armored targets.

Here are a few interesting pieces of trivia about the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges:

  • The .44 Special cartridge was developed by Smith & Wesson and introduced in 1908. It was initially chambered in the Smith & Wesson New Century revolver, also known as the S&W Model 10.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge was developed by Smith & Wesson and introduced in 1956. It was initially chambered in the Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver, which was made famous by its use in the Hollywood movie “Dirty Harry.”
  • The .44 Special cartridge was originally intended to be used as a target shooting cartridge, but it quickly gained popularity among law enforcement agencies and civilian shooters for its high stopping power.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge was originally marketed as a hunting cartridge, and it quickly gained popularity among recreational shooters and hunters for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber.
  • Both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are based on the same case design, and they share many of the same physical characteristics. However, the .44 Magnum is a high-pressure cartridge, while the .44 Special is a relatively low-pressure cartridge.
  • The .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges have been used in a number of famous Hollywood movies and TV shows, including “Dirty Harry,” “Magnum, P.I.” and “The Walking Dead.”

Other interesting information about the .44 Magnum or the .44 Special, including esoteric comparisons

Which cartridge is considered a more mainstream self defense cartridge between the .357 and the .44?

Both the .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum cartridges are popular choices for self-defense, and they are both known for their high stopping power and relatively large caliber. However, the .357 Magnum cartridge is generally considered to be more mainstream and more widely used for self-defense than the .44 Magnum cartridge.

The .357 Magnum cartridge was developed in the early 20th century as a more powerful alternative to the .38 Special cartridge, and it quickly gained popularity among law enforcement agencies and civilian shooters for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber. Today, the .357 Magnum is one of the most widely-used handgun cartridges in the world, and it is widely available from a range of manufacturers.

The .44 Magnum cartridge, on the other hand, is a high-pressure cartridge that was developed in the mid-20th century as a more powerful version of the .44 Special cartridge. It is known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber, and it is commonly used for handgun hunting, self-defense, and target shooting. However, the .44 Magnum is not as widely used for self-defense as the .357 Magnum, and it is not as widely available from manufacturers as the .357 Magnum.

Compare the .44 Magnum to the .357 Magnum from a ballistic perspective in all metrics

The .44 Magnum and .357 Magnum cartridges are both known for their high stopping power and relatively large caliber. Here are some of the key differences between the two cartridges from a ballistic perspective:

  • Caliber: The .44 Magnum cartridge is a .44 caliber cartridge, while the .357 Magnum cartridge is a .357 caliber cartridge.
  • Case length: The .44 Magnum cartridge has a case length of 1.29 inches, while the .357 Magnum cartridge has a case length of 1.29 inches.
  • Bullet weight: The .44 Magnum cartridge can be loaded with bullet weights ranging from 180 grains to 300 grains, while the .357 Magnum cartridge can be loaded with bullet weights ranging from 110 grains to 180 grains.
  • Muzzle velocity: The .44 Magnum cartridge typically has a muzzle velocity of around 1,400 feet per second, while the .357 Magnum cartridge typically has a muzzle velocity of around 1,500 feet per second.
  • Muzzle energy: The .44 Magnum cartridge typically has a muzzle energy of around 1,400 foot-pounds, while the .357 Magnum cartridge typically has a muzzle energy of around 1,500 foot-pounds.
  • Recoil: The .44 Magnum cartridge generates more recoil than the .357 Magnum cartridge, due to its larger caliber and higher muzzle energy.

Overall, the .44 Magnum and .357 Magnum cartridges are similar in many ways, but the .44 Magnum cartridge is generally considered to be more powerful and generate more recoil than the .357 Magnum cartridge.

How does the .44-40 and other blackpowder or smokeless powder alternatives in the .44 diameter compare to these cartridges?

The .44-40 cartridge is a centerfire handgun cartridge that was developed in the 1870s. It is a relatively low-pressure cartridge that was designed for use with blackpowder and is known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber. The .44-40 cartridge is still widely used today by shooters and collectors, and it is compatible with a range of firearms, including revolvers and rifles.

The .44-40 cartridge has a number of characteristics that distinguish it from the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges, which are both high-pressure cartridges that were designed for use with smokeless powder. Some of the key differences between the .44-40 and the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges include:

  • The .44-40 cartridge is a lower-pressure cartridge than the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges, which means it generates lower velocities and muzzle energies.
  • The .44-40 cartridge is typically used with blackpowder, while the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges are typically used with smokeless powder.
  • The .44-40 cartridge is generally not as powerful or as accurate as the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges, due to its lower pressure and use of blackpowder.

Overall, the .44-40 cartridge is a historic and popular cartridge that is known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber, but it is generally not considered to be as powerful or as accurate as the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges, which are high-pressure cartridges designed for use with smokeless powder.

What is a .44-77 Sharps? What other esoteric or rare firearms and chamberings exist which utilize a .44 caliber projectile?

The .44-77 Sharps cartridge is a blackpowder cartridge that was developed in the late 19th century for use in Sharps rifles. It is a relatively large caliber cartridge that is known for its high stopping power and long effective range. The .44-77 Sharps cartridge was popular with long-range shooters and hunters in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and it is still popular with collectors and shooters today.

There are a number of other esoteric or rare firearms and chamberings that utilize a .44 caliber projectile. Here are a few examples:

  • The .44 Russian cartridge was developed in the late 19th century for use in Russian service revolvers and is known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber.
  • The .44 Webley cartridge was developed in the late 19th century for use in British service revolvers and is known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber.
  • The .44 Smith & Wesson American cartridge was developed in the late 19th century for use in Smith & Wesson revolvers and is known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber.
  • The .44 Smith & Wesson Russian cartridge was developed in the late 19th century for use in Smith & Wesson revolvers and is known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber.

Compare the .44 Magnum AND the .44 Special to the .45-70 GOVT in all ballistic metrics

The .44 Magnum, .44 Special, and .45-70 Government (GOVT) cartridges are all known for their high stopping power and relatively large caliber. Here are some of the key differences between these cartridges from a ballistic perspective:

  • Caliber: The .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges are .44 caliber cartridges, while the .45-70 GOVT cartridge is a .45 caliber cartridge.
  • Case length: The .44 Magnum cartridge has a case length of 1.29 inches, the .44 Special cartridge has a case length of 1.16 inches, and the .45-70 GOVT cartridge has a case length of 2.10 inches.
  • Bullet weight: The .44 Magnum cartridge can be loaded with bullet weights ranging from 180 grains to 300 grains, the .44 Special cartridge can be loaded with bullet weights ranging from 180 grains to 240 grains, and the .45-70 GOVT cartridge can be loaded with bullet weights ranging from 300 grains to 550 grains.
  • Muzzle velocity: The .44 Magnum cartridge typically has a muzzle velocity of around 1,400 feet per second, the .44 Special cartridge typically has a muzzle velocity of around 900-1,000 feet per second, and the .45-70 GOVT cartridge typically has a muzzle velocity of around 1,400-2,000 feet per second.
  • Muzzle energy: The .44 Magnum cartridge typically has a muzzle energy of around 1,400 foot-pounds, the .44 Special cartridge typically has a muzzle energy of around 600-800 foot-pounds, and the .45-70 GOVT cartridge typically has a muzzle energy of around 2,000-3,000 foot-pounds.
  • Recoil: The .44 Magnum and .45-70 GOVT cartridges generate more recoil than the .44 Special cartridge, due to their larger caliber and higher muzzle energy.

Overall, the .44 Magnum, .44 Special, and .45-70 GOVT cartridges are all similar in many ways, but the .44 Magnum and .45-70 GOVT cartridges are generally considered to be more powerful and generate more recoil than the .44 Special cartridge.

Surely there must be some more information that you know about these cartridges that have not already been shared, right? Tell me something that most members of the general public don’t know about the .44 cartridges we’ve been speaking about.

There is a wide range of information available about the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges, and it is likely that there are many details and nuances that are not widely known by the general public. Here are a few things that may be of interest:

  • The .44 Special cartridge was developed in the early 20th century as a more powerful alternative to the popular .44 S&W Russian cartridge. The .44 Special was designed to be used in revolvers, and it was initially chambered in a number of popular revolver models, including the Smith & Wesson New Century and the Colt Single Action Army.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge was developed in the mid-20th century as a more powerful version of the .44 Special cartridge. The .44 Magnum was designed to be used in revolvers, and it was initially chambered in a number of popular revolver models, including the Smith & Wesson Model 29 and the Colt Anaconda.
  • Both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are known for their high stopping power and relatively large caliber, which make them suitable for use against larger or more heavily-armored targets. The .44 Special is a relatively low-pressure cartridge, while the .44 Magnum is a high-pressure cartridge.
  • In the late 20th century, the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges gained widespread popularity among handgun shooters and hunters, and they continue to be popular choices for these applications today. Both cartridges are widely available from a range of manufacturers, and they are used in a wide range of firearms, including revolvers and semi-automatic pistols.
  • The .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges have been used in a number of famous Hollywood movies and TV shows, including “Dirty Harry,” which helped to increase their popularity and notoriety.

Criminals, Cowboys, Law Enforcement, and other tie-ins to the .44 Magnum and .44 Special

Are there any famous criminals or crimes, or famous people who were known for using either of these cartridges?

There are a number of famous criminals or crimes, and famous people who have been associated with the .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges. Here are a few examples:

  • The .44 Magnum cartridge gained widespread notoriety in the 1970s due to its use in the Hollywood movie “Dirty Harry,” in which it was used by the main character, played by actor Clint Eastwood. The .44 Magnum was subsequently used in a number of other movies and TV shows.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge has been used by a number of infamous criminals, including serial killer David “Son of Sam” Berkowitz, who used a .44 Magnum revolver to commit a series of murders in New York City in the 1970s.
  • The .44 Special cartridge has been used by a number of famous law enforcement officers and military personnel, including U.S. Secret Service agents, who have carried the .44 Special as their primary sidearm for many years.
  • The .44 Magnum cartridge has been used by a number of famous hunters and outdoorsmen, including Ted Nugent, who is known for his love of hunting and shooting.

Were there any famous cowboys, lawmen, or fugitives in the old west that used these cartridges?

The .44 Magnum and .44 Special cartridges were not developed until the mid-20th century, so they were not widely available during the period of the Old West. However, there were a number of famous cowboys, lawmen, and fugitives in the Old West who used other large-caliber handgun cartridges, including the .45 Colt and the .44-40.

  • The .45 Colt cartridge was developed in the 1870s and was widely used by cowboys, lawmen, and outlaws in the Old West. It was chambered in a number of firearms, including revolvers and rifles, and it was known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber.
  • The .44-40 cartridge was developed in the 1870s and was widely used by cowboys, lawmen, and outlaws in the Old West. It was chambered in a number of firearms, including revolvers and rifles, and it was known for its high stopping power and relatively large caliber.

Both the .45 Colt and .44-40 cartridges were widely used in the Old West and were popular choices for self-defense, hunting, and target shooting. They have a long and storied history, and they are still widely used by shooters and collectors today.

What are some famous blackpowder cartridges (not muzzle loaders or ball and cap) firearms that utilized the .44?

There are a number of famous blackpowder cartridges (not muzzle loaders or ball and cap) firearms that utilized the .44 caliber. Here are a few examples:

  • The Colt Single Action Army revolver, also known as the “Peacemaker,” was one of the most famous firearms of the Old West and was chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44-40. The Single Action Army revolver was widely used by cowboys, lawmen, and outlaws in the Old West, and it is still popular with collectors and shooters today.
  • The Winchester Model 1873 rifle was one of the most famous firearms of the Old West and was chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44-40. The Model 1873 rifle was widely used by cowboys, lawmen, and outlaws in the Old West, and it is still popular with collectors and shooters today.
  • The Remington Model 1875 revolver was a popular handgun of the Old West and was chambered in a number of calibers, including the .44-40. The Model 1875 revolver was widely used by cowboys, lawmen, and outlaws in the Old West, and it is still popular with collectors and shooters today.

Is there any police force that issues or allows either of these cartridges to be used or firearms which chamber these cartridges to be used in the line of duty?

It is difficult to determine whether any specific police forces issue or allow the use of .44 Special or .44 Magnum cartridges or firearms chambered for these cartridges in the line of duty, as police agencies have their own policies and procedures for selecting and issuing firearms and ammunition to their officers.

In general, the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges are considered to be suitable for a wide range of shooting applications, including self-defense, hunting, and target shooting. Both cartridges are known for their high stopping power and relatively large caliber, which make them suitable for use against larger or more heavily-armored targets.

It is possible that some police agencies may issue or allow the use of .44 Special or .44 Magnum cartridges or firearms chambered for these cartridges in the line of duty, depending on the specific needs and preferences of the agency and the specific duties of the officers. However, it is also possible that other agencies may choose to use other calibers or cartridges that are better suited to their specific needs and preferences.

I recommend that you consult with the specific police agency that you are interested in to learn more about their policies and procedures for selecting and issuing firearms and ammunition to their officers. This will give you a better understanding of the specific options that are available to officers in that agency.

As a final point in the discussion re: law enforcement agencies or Sheriff’s departments, etc. issuing or allowing exemptions for these cartridges, it’s HIGHLY LIKELY that there are more than a few agencies which will allow the use of a .44 Magnum for on-duty use. It is HIGHLY UNLIKELY that any officer is using the .44 Special as a primary on-duty firearm, though it is probably accurate to say that many have chosen off-duty or secondary guns chambered in .44 Special or .44 Magnum.

Agencies tend to trend towards cartridges and firearms for which there is heavy law enforcement adoption contemporaneous to the time they select/renew department procedural documents and best practices. These cartridges are currently outliers relative to other rounds like the 9mm, .40 S&W, .357 Magnum, .45ACP, and other rounds, even including more esoteric law enforcement options like the 10mm. 

Because the data is so important to legalities, liabilities and potential lawsuits, it’s unlikely that any mainstream agency would be choosing these cartridges as frontline options. 

The .44 Special vs. the .44 Magnum with regards to Preparedness, Survival, homesteading, etc. 

Is there a good case to be made for either of these cartridges from a stockpiling or general survivalist or preparedness perspective?

Both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum cartridges have a number of features that make them appealing from a stockpiling or survivalist perspective. Here are a few reasons why these cartridges might be a good choice for someone who is interested in stockpiling or preparing for a survival scenario:

  • Versatility: Both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum are versatile cartridges that can be used for a variety of purposes, including self-defense, hunting, and target shooting. This versatility can be useful in a survival situation where a single firearm and cartridge may need to serve multiple roles.
  • Power: Both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum are powerful cartridges that can deliver significant energy to the target and can be effective at taking down medium to large game animals. This can be important in a survival situation where food may need to be obtained through hunting.
  • Reliability: Both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum are relatively reliable cartridges that are capable of producing good accuracy and performance when used with high-quality components and firearms. This reliability can be important in a survival situation where a firearm may need to function reliably in a variety of conditions.
  • Availability: Both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum are popular cartridges that are widely available, and there is a wide range of firearms, ammunition, and components available for these cartridges. This can be important in a survival situation where replacement components or ammunition may be needed.

That being said, it is worth noting that both the .44 Special and .44 Magnum have their own specific strengths and weaknesses, and it is important for someone who is interested in stockpiling or preparing for a survival scenario to carefully consider their specific needs and preferences when selecting a cartridge.

 

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