Food List for Bugout Bag [30 Best Choices & Why]

In this article, I will cover 30 of the best bugout bag foods that are highly nutritious.

Food is the body’s fuel. During an emergency, you may be forced to make the difficult decision of bugging out or fleeing your home at any time.

A robust 72-hour food supply in your bugout bag will ensure that your nutritional and caloric requirements are covered regardless of the circumstances. 

According to the rule of threes, the average individual can go three weeks without eating. That may be true, but you don’t want to be around me after 12 hours. A weekend without a nice meal can irritate even the most level-headed individual.

This piece will go over which are the best bugout bag foods are best.

Get your pen or pencil ready and take careful notes.

We chose bugout bag foods that match at least a few of the following criteria:

1. They have a long shelf life: Because your bag should be replenished every six months, we’ve picked food items with a least a six-month minimum shelf life

2. They’re light: You may be carrying your backpack for several hours at a time. Choosing lightweight food keeps the weight of your pack to a minimum.

3. They’re nutrient-dense: Your body requires calories, lipids, protein, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins to function correctly. In a bugout situation, you may be doing the more strenuous physical activity than usual, which means you’ll be burning more calories. Nutritional components are essential for your energy and wellness!

4. They’re simple to prepare: We recommend things that don’t require much preparation. Because you don’t know if you’ll be able to start a fire or set up a cooking area, pre-cooked foods are the best option. Furthermore, the time you would generally spend cooking could be better spent on other crucial tasks.

5. They’re tasty: Just because you’re bugging out doesn’t mean you have to make it a miserable experience for yourself. We only select items that we are confident you will appreciate.

6. Reasonable price: Simply because something is pricey does not make it superior. Stick to mid-priced items and make sure to read reviews and star ratings (if possible) before making a purchase.

30 Best Bugout Bag Foods

Without further ado, here is the complete list, with explanations of why they’re the best for you.

1. Nuts

A variety of nuts is an excellent survival food item to add to your bag. Nuts are abundant in calories and good fats, making them a fantastic energy source for the body. They also help the prepper feel fuller, which is considerable assistance when the going gets tough, and food supplies are scarce.

It’s worth noting that pistachio nuts (Amazon link) are high in minerals, vitamins, and flavor. Salted nuts can help replace salt lost through excessive sweating, but they can make you thirsty. You must be cautious and check the sodium content.

Salted nuts can help replace the salt lost due to excessive sweating, but they might also make you thirstier—dehydration results from consuming too much sodium.

2. Raisins

Look no further than raisins if you’re searching for a light snack with many carbs. When I was in college, I used to eat these after every gym workout because they rapidly replenished my energy levels. One cup of raisins contains about 500 calories!

3. Beans

Beans Bugout Bag Food

Pinto beans are a popular choice among meal preppers. They do put forth the effort to prepare. Therefore that should be considered. You’ll need a pot that can be placed over a fire. A bag of beans will need to be cooked in water over a fire for at least an hour. A single bag of beans, on the other hand, contains a substantial amount of protein. 

But, with canned beans (Amazon link), you can bypass the cooking process. However, they may be slightly heavier and bulkier.

4. Seeds

Chia, flax, and sunflower seeds are light in weight and high in healthful oils and vitality. Sprouts are much healthier than seeds and may be readily cultivated with little water and sunlight.

5. Lentils

Lentils not only have a high nutritional content, but they also retain many of their nutrients during cooking.

6. Crackers

Many of the things on the menu pair well with crackers. They are a bit bulky, so you must evaluate the type and quantity you are willing to carry. Crackers make it easier to consume your dried hummus and peanut butter pouches.

7. Instant Noodles

Instant noodles are an excellent choice for your BOB. They are portable, high in carbs, and the flavor sachet contains salt, which is required to replenish the body’s electrolytes. Instant noodles are really light, but they make an excellent supper.

Carbohydrates abound in the packs. There is salt in the flavor package. Eating actual meals might be soothing after a long journey or a difficult day.

8. Spam

Here’s another protein-rich option, but one that’s a little unusual. To include Spam in your BOB or INCH bag, you must like the taste of it. Heat the Spam pouches (Amazon link) in a cup of boiling water.

9. Tuna

You want a variety of protein sources for your bags. Tuna cans are out because they tend to weigh down your suitcase. They are delicious, cold, or warm.

For a snack, spread some tuna on a cracker. Tuna and salmon pouches are relatively inexpensive, costing roughly one dollar apiece. They are also available in flavored varieties, which is nice.

10. Dried Soup

Dried Soup Bugout Bag Foods

Dried soups may be readily stored in paper bags or envelopes and then mixed with hot water to provide a nutritious and quick dinner.

11. Instant Oatmeal

Oatmeal is another tried-and-true favorite. Simply add a handful of oatmeal to boiling water to make a nice porridge. Depending on availability, it may be sweetened or flavored with sugar or dried fruit. It is full and convenient, and the primary ingredient is light, easy to store, and high in fiber.

Instant oatmeal is largely carbs, but it’s a terrific way to start the day. There are several varieties to choose from, and they take up very little space in your bags.

12. Jerky

Dried beef is a source of protein for the body. It is portable, easy to store, and can be eaten on the go. However, because it is flesh, predators such as bears find it appealing. If you’re traveling through the bear territory, don’t bring any unsealed or open meals, especially jerky or other dried meat.

Beef jerky is available in a variety of tastes and packaging. It has a lot of protein. However, beef jerky contains a greater level of salt, which might cause dehydration if consumed in excess.

13. Dehydrated Veggies

Dehydrated vegetables are simple to rehydrate with water and make excellent additions to dinners and lunches. If you want to improve your self-sufficiency, you should learn to dehydrate your own fruits and vegetables at home.

14. Cereal

Cereal and breakfast bars are excellent sources of energy if you need an energy booster. They commonly have oats and some fruit in them. They may add flavor and excitement to your pack! Cereal also provides carbs to your diet while providing a sense of comfort.

15. Protein Bars

When you walk for an extended period of time, you require energy and protein to keep going. Protein bars are popular among hikers. They are portable and may be eaten on the go.

The majority of them are quite tasty. The one disadvantage of protein bars is that they might be messy. A few protein bars will fit into your backpack and will take up very little room.

16. Dried Fruit

Dried fruits are high in sugar and can be consumed at any time to replace depleted energy reserves. There are numerous tasty dried fruits that will keep you going, such as pineapple, raisins, banana, mango, berries, and apples.

Crystallized ginger adds a pleasant flavor and is also believed to help with digestion. There are numerous dried fruit options, ranging from apricots to apples. Because they are high in sugar, they might provide an energy boost when you are feeling low.

17. Instant Rice

Instant Rice Bugout Bag Foods

Instant rice packets (Amazon link) are fantastic for quick meals and a great addition to your BOB for a complete meal.

Remember that these pouches are high in sodium and carbohydrates. Rice pouches should not be used for every sort of dish. You can, however, combine them with your tuna pouch to make a complete meal.

18. Protein Powder

Protein powder can be unpleasant, but it is a good source of protein and nutrients for you. All you need to do is mix the powder with water. Fill a plastic baggie with scoops and place them in your bag.

19. Electrolyte Powder

You can also have electrolyte powders in your luggage, which you can simply add to the BOB bag. They will help you stay hydrated.

20. Pemmican

Pemmican is a well-known survival meal, so you know it has a lengthy shelf-life. The fact that it is lightweight, nonetheless, qualifies it as bugout bag food.

Here’s how to make your own pemmican.

21. MREs

These do violate some of the criteria we’ve established because they are high in salt and pricey, but if you can get them on sale, you might as well stock up.

If you don’t want to break the bank, here’s how to make homemade MREs.

22. Vitamin Pills

Include a few multivitamins. They’re light and worth every cent in a survival situation.

23. Hardtack

Stack of hardtack biscuits

These are basically crackers but with a much longer shelf life. Here’s how to make hardtack

24. Sardines

They’re high in protein, good fats, and calories. A single tin will last you several hours.

25. Meat Paste

Beef, chicken, and ham paste are all widely available and popular in the United States. It can be used as a spread or spooned straight from the jar.

26. Raw Nut Butter

Raw nuts are another high-nutrient, high-fat option. Nut butter stays for a long time, and a small amount goes a long way. Cooking nuts destroys their delicate lipids, making them inflammatory and stripping them of many of their beneficial parts.

27. Honey

Honey is a miraculous food. It’s also a miracle cure. There’s no reason not to bring some with you. Wherever possible, get raw, unfiltered honey that hasn’t been pasteurized.

28. Fruit Leather

Fruit leather is made of natural sugar with a strong flavor. Toss a few rolls into your backpack and tear a treat off.

29. GORP

One of the first high-energy trail snacks was raisins and peanuts. GORP has been around for a long time. It was a solid option back then, and it is still a good option today. To keep the nuts from getting rancid, rotate them every few months.

30. Tortillas

Bread is large and perishable, so substitute dried biscuits and tortillas. They are still high in carbohydrates, filling, and can be eaten raw. Tortillas are high in carbs and can be combined with other foods. It goes well with tuna or salmon to round off your dinner.

Last Words

Preppers frequently create bugout bags due to a reaction rather than forethought.

Tossing a bunch of food into a bugout bag will result in either a collection of improper nutrition or insufficient food. Both can result in a dangerous situation if the SHTF. Spend some time planning up your bug out bag, snacks, drinks, and other things.

Allocate space and weight to the calories you’ll need to get out of harm’s way and to safety. These selections are a significant improvement over the traditional bugout bag fare. Keep prepping!

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1 thought on “Food List for Bugout Bag [30 Best Choices & Why]”

  1. Simple suggestions for novices who wish to stockpile food in the event of a calamity. What a solid of bugout bag foods!

    Reply

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