How to Keep Kerosene Heaters from Smelling [The Correct Answer]

If you have a Kerosene heater, you’ve probably noticed that it gives off a pretty unpleasant smell. So, this gets you thinking – what can I do about this? 

This is a very good question and question you should ask if anything smells unpleasant in your house. Having an unpleasant smell isn’t inviting to guests and isn’t pleasant to you. So, how to keep kerosene heater from smelling?

There are many methods to stop a kerosene heater from stinking up the place. A few of the popular methods include:

  1. Using Additives
  2. Using Unexpired Kerosene Fuel
  3. Cleaning Out Your Tank
  4. Keeping Your Wick Trimmed
  5. And More

So, if you’re wondering how to get your kerosene heater smelling better than freshly cut lemons, then this article is for you.

Let’s dive in.

Using additives is one way to stop your kerosene heater from smelling. On the market, there are several chemicals that are made particularly to get rid of or lessen the smell of kerosene. Before the kerosene is poured to the heater’s tank, these additives are typically added to it. 

Fragrances like lemon or lavender and substances that mask kerosene’s strong odor are examples of typical additions. When utilizing additives, it’s crucial to adhere to the manufacturer’s directions and to use just those that are safe and recommended for your particular heater.

2. Using Unexpired Kerosene Fuel

fresh kerosene

Using kerosene that hasn’t expired is another way to lessen the stink coming from your kerosene heater. Fuel will expire (typically within five years), and when it does, it could start to smell really bad. 

Check the kerosene’s expiry date before buying it and putting it in your heater to prevent this. When your kerosene is about to expire or has already expired, it is essential to carefully dispose the low quality fuel and replace it with a new supply.

3. Cleaning Out Your Tank

Regular fuel tank cleaning is another approach to lessen the smell of your kerosene heater. The bad odor of the fuel might be caused by debris and other pollutants that can build up in the fuel tank over time. 

It’s crucial to use the proper equipment and cleaning supplies while cleaning out the tank monthly, as well as to adhere to the manufacturer’s recommendations. 

It may be necessary to empty the fuel tank, scrape it with a brush or another cleaning equipment, and then rinse it with water to do this. Before adding more kerosene, the tank has to dry out totally.

By the way, if you operate a truck that uses diesel fuel, mixing in some kerosene in cold weather is a good idea.

4. Keeping Your Wick Trimmed

Maintaining a trimmed kerosene heater wick on your kerosene heater is another way to lessen its odor. The component of the heater that absorbs the fuel and generates heat is the wick. 

The wick may accumulate carbon buildup and other impurities over time, which can add to the kerosene smell. It’s crucial to use the right equipment and adhere to the manufacturer’s directions in order to maintain the wick trimmed. 

To do this, you may need to use a pair of scissors or similar cutting device to trim the wick. Before igniting the heater, the wick must be entirely dry.

5. Getting a Higher Quality Wick

Investing in a better wick can help you lessen the smell of your kerosene heater. A cleaner, more effective burn is often produced by higher quality wicks, which are frequently built of materials that are more clog-resistant. 

This will help to lessen the fuel’s smell. When changing the wick, it’s crucial to follow to the manufacturer’s directions and to only use wicks that are safe and recommended for your particular heater.

6. Cleaning The Wick

The wick may accumulate carbon buildup and other impurities over time, which can add to the kerosene smell. It’s crucial to use the proper equipment and cleaning supplies while according to the manufacturer’s directions while cleaning the wick. 

In order to do this, the heater’s wick may need to be taken out, cleaned with a damp towel or another cleaning instrument, and then reinserted. Before reinstalling the wick in the heater, it’s crucial to let it thoroughly dry.

7. Shutting Them Down Outside

A kerosene heater may continue to give out an unpleasant scent for a short while after being switched off. It is a good idea to turn off the heater outdoors, away from any open windows or doors, in order to reduce odor in your house. 

8. Getting a Higher Quality Kerosene Heater

Purchasing a better heater is another way to lessen the kerosene heater’s odor. The smell of the kerosene may be lessened by higher-quality heaters since they are normally designed to burn cleaner and more effectively. 

It’s essential to do research and choose a heater with a good track record for emitting less kerosene odor.

9. Replacing Your Vent Cap

Changing your vent cap is another approach to lessen the smell of your kerosene heater. On the top of the heater, there is a little part called a vent cap that controls how much air enters the heater. 

The kerosene smell may be brought on over time by the vent cap being clogged with dirt and other contaminants. 

It might be wise to get a new vent cap to solve this problem. When changing the vent cap, it’s essential to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations and to use only vent caps that are safe and recommended for your particular heater.

10. Adding Baking Soda to the Tank

Adding baking soda to the tank is another way to lessen the smell of your kerosene heater. Baking soda is a natural odor absorber that may aid in masking the unpleasant fuel stench. 

Simply add some baking soda to the tank when you refill it with kerosene to apply this method. It is crucial to adhere to the manufacturer’s recommendations and only use a tiny bit of baking soda since using more might prevent the heater from working properly.

FAQ

Now, let’s cover a few related questions.

Is It OK to Use A Kerosene Heater Indoors?

Kerosene heaters should generally not be used inside. Despite the fact that certain kerosene heaters (mostly modern kerosene heaters) are designed for indoor usage, they can still emit kerosene vapor that are dangerous for your health if breathed. 

To reduce the chance of inhaling dangerous emissions, it’s essential to adhere to the manufacturer’s recommendations and operate the heater in a well-ventilated location.

What Makes A Kerosene Heater Smell?

A kerosene heater may have an unpleasant odor for a number of reasons, such as the use of old or poor quality kerosene, a filthy or clogged wick, or an unreliable heater.

Can Fumes From A Kerosene Heater Be Harmful?

Breathing kerosene heater fumes might be dangerous. Kerosene is a flammable liquid that, when burnt emits emissions that may include hazardous compounds.

Last Words

There are nearly a dozen good ways to eradicate or, at the very least, limit the amount of odor your Kerosene heater gives off. 

You should always follow your manufacturer’s instructions and look at their website FAQs to see what you can do for your particular heater model. 

Let us know in the comments if any of these worked for you or if anything else worked for you. Either way, keep prepping!

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